HCPLive Network

Aromatase Inhibitor-Associated Arthralgia May be Influenced by Genetics

Investigators presented new research that reveals a possible genetic basis for why Aromatase inhibitor-associated arthralgia (AIAA) occurs in breast cancer survivors and shows promise for treating the side effect without interfering with the drug’s efficacy.
 
AIAA produces severe joint pain and as many as 10% of women experiencing AIAA choose to prematurely discontinue their drug treatment as a result.
 
The research was performed by investigators from the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center and presented during the 2010 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.
 
The team, led by Jun Mao, MD, MSCE, assistant professor of Family Medicine and Community Health, studied individual genetic variations that could potentially influence both the onset and severity of AIAA. The team studied 390 postmenopausal women with stage 0 to III breast cancer. All the women were receiving adjuvant therapy with aromatase inhibitors who reported joint pain related to their drug therapy.
 
Women carrying at lease one copy of a “7-repeat” genetic variant in the aromatase enzyme (CYP19A1) had a lower chance of developing AAIA than those with at-least one “8-repeat” allele of the same gene. Additionally, having at least one copy of a specific IL-6 haplotype was also correlated with increased pain severity, while the presence of a different variant of that gene was associated with decreased pain.
 
"Due to genetic differences, women respond differently to aromatase inhibitors with regard to estrogen levels and inflammatory processes, and as a result, some women are more likely to have this pain or have more severe pain," said Angela DeMichele, MD, MSCE, an associate professor of Hematology/Oncology and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and a co-author on all three of the studies, in a news release. "There are millions of women receiving AIs, as many as 50 percent of them experience some level of arthralgia, and up to 10 percent discontinue their treatment prematurely, so this is a significant issue."
 


Further Reading
Having regular family meals may help protect teens from the harmful mental health effects of "cyberbullying," a new study suggests. The study was published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Pediatrics.
A major demonstration project designed to gauge the effectiveness of bundled payments exposed the complications of implementing such a system. Officials say the 3-year study fizzled after participation waned and the number of applicable cases proved too few to be statistically relevant.
The quality of Americans' diets has improved somewhat but remains poor overall, and dietary disparity between the rich and poor is growing, a new study shows. Education also played a role in dietary quality, which was lowest and improved more slowly among people who had 12 years or less of school, according to the study published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
The newest final rule for the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs provides more flexibility in how healthcare providers use certified electronic health record technology to meet meaningful use for an incentive reporting period in 2014.
Nine percent of top-selling packaged food products in the United States contain partially hydrogenated oils, with most of these products reporting 0 grams of trans fat per serving, according to a study published Aug. 28 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder stimulant treatment in children is not associated with significant changes in growth, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Pediatrics.
Girls exposed to maternal gestational diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia in utero have elevated risk of childhood adiposity, particularly if the mother is overweight or obese, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Diabetes Care.
More Reading