HCPLive Network

Affordable Care Act Exchanges Are Up and Running

 
TUESDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the first federal government shutdown in 17 years and a push by Republicans in the House of Representatives to delay further implementation of "Obamacare," the Affordable Care Act's health insurance exchanges opened for business today.

The new health exchanges offer one-stop shopping for health insurance coverage where eligible Americans can compare health plans and prices and choose coverage based on their needs. The exchanges will also help consumers determine whether they are eligible for public health coverage under Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program.

According to estimates by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, some seven million people are expected to enroll in private health coverage through the exchanges in 2014; another nine million will enroll in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. How smoothly enrollment goes will vary by state. Officials in Colorado, Oregon, and the District of Columbia have announced computer system issues prior to the kick-off of open enrollment, which runs through March 31, 2014. People in Oregon can't apply for coverage online for several weeks. Those who want to apply immediately must contact one of the exchange's licensed agents or community partners.

Jesse Ellis O'Brien, a health care advocate with the Oregon State Public Interest Research Group Foundation, told HealthDay he "wouldn't be surprised" if other states found their websites weren't quite ready to go live, either. "I think the key thing is Oct. 1 is a starting point -- it's not a finish line," he added.

More Information
 
Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
Even though the active ingredient in marijuana can be associated with memory impairment, it may slow or halt Alzheimer’s disease.
A prognostic model has been developed and validated which has adequate discrimination for major outcomes in type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in Diabetologia.
The costs of Medicare associated with Sovaldi (sofosbuvir), an emerging hepatitis C drug, will vary depending on how many people are given the treatment, a blog in Health Affairs found.
For patients with cancer, factors associated with late admission to hospice have been identified, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Healthcare practices continue to suffer from embezzlement problems. While there is no such thing as a perfect system to prevent embezzlers, there are ways to deter them.
Revised guidelines recommend athletes to drink when they are thirsty and to supplement post-training fluids with “recovery foods.”
Gastroparesis, or delayed gastric emptying, remains misunderstood despite rising prevalence, according to a news release from the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD), a nonprofit research and education organization addressing issues surrounding gastrointestinal and motility disorders.
More Reading