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Appropriate Use Criteria Established for Amyloid PET

 
TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Experts have agreed upon appropriate use criteria for positron emission tomography (PET) of brain amyloid β, according to a report published online Jan. 28 in Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Keith A. Johnson, M.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues, together with the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, convened the Amyloid Imaging Task Force to provide guidance to dementia care practitioners, patients, and caregivers. Peer-reviewed, published literature was reviewed to develop a consensus opinion about the use of amyloid PET in specific clinical scenarios.

The researchers developed and agreed upon a series of specific appropriate use criteria to define the patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used. Amyloid imaging is appropriate when the following criteria are met: there is evidence of a cognitive complaint with objectively confirmed impairment; when Alzheimer's disease is a possible diagnosis, but that diagnosis is uncertain after a comprehensive evaluation by an expert; and when knowledge of amyloid pathology is likely to increase diagnostic certainty and alter management.

"Because both dementia care and amyloid PET technology are in active development, these appropriate use criteria will require periodic reassessment," the authors write. "Future research directions are also outlined, including diagnostic utility and patient-centered outcomes."

Multiple Task Force members and reviewers disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical and other health care companies.
 

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