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Biomarker May Predict Gestational Diabetes Development

TUESDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Increased plasma concentrations of soluble (pro)renin receptor during the first trimester of pregnancy may predict the development of gestational diabetes mellitus, according to research published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Noriyoshi Watanabe, MD, of the Tokyo Women's Medical University, and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study between 2010 and 2011 involving 716 women who first visited a referral birth center during their first trimester of a singleton pregnancy. None of the women had preexisting diabetes mellitus.

The researchers found that 44 women (6.1 percent) had gestational diabetes mellitus and 672 women (93.9 percent) did not. After multivariate adjustment for baseline characteristics, medical complications, and gestational characteristics, the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus for women in the highest versus the lowest quartile of soluble (pro)renin receptor concentration was 2.90.

"We found that increased soluble (pro)renin receptor concentrations in the first trimester were associated with the development of gestational diabetes mellitus later in pregnancy," the authors write. "Further studies will be needed to clarify whether soluble (pro)renin receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes mellitus."

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