HCPLive Network

Case Study Identifies B. miyamotoi As Cause of Meningoencephalitis

 
THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The spirochete, Borrelia miyamotoi, may be an underrecognized cause of meningoencephalitis, according to a case study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Joseph L. Gugliotta, M.D., of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, N.J., and colleagues report the case of a B. miyamotoi infection-associated meningoencephalitis which developed in an immunocompromised patient.

According to the report, an 80-year-old woman who lived on a farm in New Jersey, who had been treated twice for Lyme Disease and was immunocompromised due to treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, developed progressive cognitive decline over a four-month period. She was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with meningoencephalitis. Although Koch's postulates were not met, the woman's illness was posited to be caused by infection with the spirochete B. miyamotoi as the organism was directly detected in cerebrospinal fluid using both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction assay. Following treatment with antibiotics, the patient's physical and mental conditions improved.

"In older persons, changes in mental status are often attributed to dementia or the aging process. Exposure of such persons to diverse microbial agents, including those thought to be nonpathogenic, such as B. miyamotoi, may represent possibilities for pathologic processes to occur," the authors write. "Immunocompromise in older patients should always prompt a more rigorous laboratory analysis, because such persons may serve as sentinels for poorly recognized or novel pathogens."
 

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Letter to the Editor


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Further Reading
Researchers are learning more about the ways in which gut microbiota interact with the central nervous system and the role this can play in pain management.
Although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, opioid-induced hyperalgesia occurs in some patients on higher doses of opioids. Treatment options include reducing, rotating, or completely tapering the opioid regimen.
Magnetic resonance is an effective alternative to biopsy for identifying and quantifying fats in the liver, according to results from a study led by a research team at the University of the Basque Country.
Daily supplements of selenium or vitamin E don't seem to protect against the development of age-related cataracts among men, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in JAMA Ophthalmology.
Workplace flu shots are a good investment, a new survey found. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Sept. 19 urged all health care personnel to get flu vaccinations. The CDC also released the results of a survey of 1,882 health care clinicians meant to determine what factors influenced those who got the shots. Among its findings, when workplaces offered free shots on-site, compliance was 61.6% when the vaccinations were offered for one day only. When they were offered for multiple days, compliance rose to 80.4%. When employers did not offer the shots at all, compliance dropped to 49.0%
Cancer patients burdened by stress and family conflicts before surgery may face a higher risk for complications following their operation, according to a study published in a recent issue of the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery.
President Barack Obama escalated the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria on Thursday, ordering key federal agencies to pursue a national strategy to deal with the threat.
More Reading