HCPLive Network

Cervical Spine Instabilities Frequently Develop in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

 
MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) initially without any cervical spine instabilities will develop some type of instability within about five years, according to research published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

Takashi Yurube, M.D., of the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan, and colleagues conducted a prospective, minimum five-year follow-up study of 140 patients with RA and no cervical involvement to assess the incidence and aggravation of cervical spine instabilities.

During approximately six years of follow-up, the researchers found that 43.6 percent of RA patients developed some type of cervical instability. Of these, 32.1 percent developed atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS), 11.4 percent developed vertical subluxation (VS), and 16.4 percent developed subaxial subluxation (SAS). Severe cervical instability was noted in 12.9 percent of all patients (AAS in 3.6 percent, VS in 6.4 percent, and SAS in 5.0 percent), and 4.3 percent developed canal stenosis, defined as space available for the spinal cord of 13 mm or less. Corticosteroid administration, mutilating changes at baseline, and development of non-mutilating into mutilating changes correlated significantly with severe instabilities.

"In conclusion, our prospective follow-up study describes the detailed incidence and predictors of cervical spine instabilities, providing useful information for clinical follow-up in patients with RA," the authors write. "Established mutilating changes and progressive development of non-mutilating into mutilating changes indicate poor prognosis of the cervical spine in patients with RA. Intensive corticosteroid treatment also correlates with the aggravation of cervical spine instabilities in RA; however, its clinical significance needs to be carefully examined."
 

Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Further Reading
In what could be New York City’s first case of Ebola, a doctor identified by the NY Post as Craig Spencer, 33, MD an emergency medicine physician at New York Hospital/Columbia-Presbyterian was rushed to a special Ebola unit at city-run Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan. Spencer returned 10 days ago from a stint as a volunteer with Doctors without Borders, caring for Ebola victims in Guinea, one of three West African nations with major outbreaks.
Patients diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy may be able to get a sense of how their condition has progressed without having to leave the comfort of their own home.
Monika Fischer, MD, talks about focusing research on patients with more severe IBD symptoms at 2014 ACG Annual Scientific Meeting in Philadelphia, PA.
Monika Fischer, MD, discusses the outcomes of a study assessing fecal microbiota transplantation for c. difficile infection at the 2014 ACG Annual Scientific Meeting in Philadelphia, PA.
Over the last decade, mortality rates for patients undergoing surgical repair for aortic dissection have improved, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.
A collaborative effort from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Florida has yielded plant leaves as a viable treatment for pulmonary hypertension.
Among Latinos, a Native American heritage was linked to a lower rate of asthma development, while an African lineage resulted in an increased asthma risk, researchers at University of California San Francisco found.
More Reading