HCPLive Network

Citrus Fruit Linked to Lower Risk of Ischemic Stroke

Aedín Cassidy, Ph.D., from the Norwich Medical School in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a prospective study among 69,622 women from the Nurses' Health Study. Total flavonoid and subclass intakes were calculated from semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaires collected every four years.

The researchers found that, over 14 years of follow-up, 1,803 strokes were confirmed. After adjusting for other variables, women in the highest quintile of flavanone intake had a relative risk (RR) of ischemic stroke of 0.81 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.99), compared with the lowest quintile. Consumption of citrus fruits and juices, the main dietary source of flavanones, tended to be associated with a reduced risk for ischemic stroke (RR, 0.90; 95 percent CI, 0.77 to 1.05) when comparing the highest and lowest quintiles.

"Total flavonoid intake was not inversely associated with risk of stroke; however, increased intake of the flavanone subclass was associated with a reduction in the risk of ischemic stroke," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed receiving funding from Unilever Research and GlaxoSmithKline for flavonoid research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Cardiovascular disease is a long-term complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and more attention toward management of its associated risk factors and modifiers is urged in a scientific statement published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.
Recent pharmaceutical studies show work in helping patients with high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels.
Advances in treatment could provide much needed help for patients with obesity, diabetes, and hypertension
Targets of workplace bullying can offer chaos, report, or quest narratives about their experiences, and coworker response plays a role in narrative development, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in Management Communication Quarterly.
Hypoglycemia related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) doesn't appear to impact brain pathology, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Diabetes Care.
After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests. The report was published online Oct. 22 in Neurology.
The US health care system ranks last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
More Reading