HCPLive Network

Coffee Appears to Reduce Depression in Women

Coffee Appears to Reduce Depression in WomenIncreased consumption of caffeinated coffee appears to reduce the risk of depression for women, finds a study published last week in Archives of Internal Medicine.
 
Previous research has indicated an increased risk of depression in men who consume coffee. Given that depression is twice as common in women as in men, the researchers were interested in determining whether there was any relationship between caffeine consumption and depression in women.
 
The current study included 50,739 women who participated in the Nurses’ Health Study. Researchers looked at questionnaires filled out by the participants between 1980 and 2004 including information on the frequency with which they had consumed caffeinated and non-caffeinated coffee, non-herbal tea, caffeinated and non-caffeinated soft drinks, and chocolate. They then followed the participants from 1996 to 2006, tracking new cases of clinical depression that were treated with regular use of antidepressants.
 
At the start of the tracking for depression, the participants had an average age of 63 and did not have depression. Cases of depression were correlated with level of caffeine consumption from 1980 through two years earlier. For example, a participant’s depression status in 2000 would be compared with caffeine consumption between 1980 and 1998.
 
During the 10-year follow-up period, researchers identified 2,607 new-onset cases of depression. When compared with women who consumed one cup or less of caffeinated coffee per week, those who consumed two to three cups per day were 15% less likely to develop depression, and those who consumed four or more cups per day were 20% less likely to develop depression.
 
The researchers note that the findings do not prove that coffee consumption is responsible for the reduction in depression. “Further investigations are needed to confirm this finding and to determine whether usual caffeinated coffee consumption can contribute to depression prevention,” they write.
 
Sources
Increased Caffeinated Coffee Consumption Associated With Decreased Risk of Depression in Women [Press Release]
Coffee, Caffeine, and Risk of Depression Among Women (abstract) [Archives of Internal Medicine

Further Reading
A pattern of sleep disturbance is a risk factor for depression and suicide and also increases the risk of cancer, infection, hypertension, weight gain, heart disease, diabetes, inflammation, osteoporosis, chronic pain, and arrhythmias. It can also have a significant negative impact on cognition and creativity.
How can clinicians help veterans with PTSD deal with depression and anxiety symptoms, and process intense feelings of shame and guilt stemming from actions and situations they experienced while serving?
Adolescent depression is a serious mental illness that results in negative health consequences and frequently recurs later in life. Although the prevalence rate of depression is around 20 percent among African American and European-American adolescents, the associated risks and utilization rates vary greatly.
For patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis, daily activities that many people take for granted, including sleep, can be interrupted or difficult, often causing psychological challenges as well.
Targets of workplace bullying can offer chaos, report, or quest narratives about their experiences, and coworker response plays a role in narrative development, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in Management Communication Quarterly.
A learning model and discussion can improve residents' attitudes and communication skills towards patients with substance abuse disorders, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Academic Medicine.
After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests. The report was published online Oct. 22 in Neurology.
More Reading