HCPLive Network

Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Tolerable in Peyronie's Disease

FRIDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Peyronie's disease, treatment with collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH) intralesional injections is efficacious and tolerable, according to research published online Feb. 1 in The Journal of Urology.

Martin Gelbard, MD, from the Urology Associates Medical Group, in Burbank, CA, and colleagues examined the clinical efficacy and safety of CCH intralesional injections among patients with Peyronie's disease (417 and 415 patients in Investigation for Maximal Peyronie's Reduction Efficacy and Safety Studies [IMPRESS] I and II, respectively). CCH injections were given through a maximum of four treatment cycles, each separated by six weeks, with two injections per cycle.

Based on meta-analysis of data from the two studies, the researchers found that patients treated with CCH experienced a mean 34 percent improvement in penile curvature deformity, compared with a mean 18.2 percent improvement seen in placebo-treated individuals (P < 0.0001). In CCH-treated versus placebo-treated individuals, the mean change in Peyronie's disease bother score was significantly improved. There were three corporal rupture serious adverse events, all of which were repaired surgically.

"The IMPRESS I and II studies support the clinical efficacy and safety of CCH treatment for both the physical and psychological aspects of Peyronie's disease," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, which funded the study and manufactures and markets CCH.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
Researchers have developed a math model that can accurately predict the progression from nephritis to interstitial fibrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.
Recent studies looking at neural response in patients with fibromyalgia have shown that people with this condition may have hypersensitivity to non-painful stimuli.
Adverse drug events involving psychiatric medications are not uncommon in emergency departments, according to a study published in JAMA Psychiatry.
Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) reported that proactive monitoring of dose adjustments of infliximab (IFX), one of the 4 anti-TNF-alpha proteins used to treat inflammatory diseases like Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), could prolong the effectiveness of treatment.
The number of Americans dying from accidental overdoses of opioid analgesics jumped significantly from 1999 to 2011, according to a September data brief published by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.
About 14.5 million US cancer survivors are alive today, compared to just three million in 1971, the American Association for Cancer Research reported Tuesday.
The outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa is showing no signs of slowing down. As a result, President Barack Obama announced Tuesday that the United States would be getting even more directly involved in the effort to contain the outbreak and prevent it from spreading any further.
More Reading