HCPLive Network

Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Tolerable in Peyronie's Disease

FRIDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Peyronie's disease, treatment with collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH) intralesional injections is efficacious and tolerable, according to research published online Feb. 1 in The Journal of Urology.

Martin Gelbard, MD, from the Urology Associates Medical Group, in Burbank, CA, and colleagues examined the clinical efficacy and safety of CCH intralesional injections among patients with Peyronie's disease (417 and 415 patients in Investigation for Maximal Peyronie's Reduction Efficacy and Safety Studies [IMPRESS] I and II, respectively). CCH injections were given through a maximum of four treatment cycles, each separated by six weeks, with two injections per cycle.

Based on meta-analysis of data from the two studies, the researchers found that patients treated with CCH experienced a mean 34 percent improvement in penile curvature deformity, compared with a mean 18.2 percent improvement seen in placebo-treated individuals (P < 0.0001). In CCH-treated versus placebo-treated individuals, the mean change in Peyronie's disease bother score was significantly improved. There were three corporal rupture serious adverse events, all of which were repaired surgically.

"The IMPRESS I and II studies support the clinical efficacy and safety of CCH treatment for both the physical and psychological aspects of Peyronie's disease," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, which funded the study and manufactures and markets CCH.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
Concerned about a mysterious outbreak of pediatric paralysis, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has asked physicians to report any similar cases. In Denver, CO, 10 children have been admitted to Children’s Hospital Colorado with limb weakness and paralysis since Aug. 1, according to the hospital.
Work, non-work, and individual factors explain a considerable part of psychological distress, depression, and emotional exhaustion, according to a study published online July 24 in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.
For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, periarticular injection is superior to epidural analgesia for pain control, according to a study published in the Sept. 3 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.
The cost of becoming a capable doctor (one who does both well and good) can come at a great price. Lay folk think it’s just all rich doctors out there. But those physicians who stick around can dig a real big financial hole for themselves.
Acupuncture doesn't improve knee pain any more than sham acupuncture, according to a new study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
For millions of overweight Americans, regular exercise remains a prime weapon against excess weight and the threat of type 2 diabetes. However, a new study suggests that the battle may be tougher for some than for others, depending on their genes. The study was published online Sept. 29 in Diabetologia.
For patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, simvastatin does not improve clinical outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, held from Sept. 27 to Oct. 1 in Barcelona, Spain.
More Reading