HCPLive Network

Coronary Artery Calcium Predicts Cardio Death in Type 2 Diabetes

 
FRIDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery calcium (CAC) predicts the risk of cardiovascular death, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in Diabetes Care.

Subhashish Agarwal, M.D., from the Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center in Dearborn, Mich., and colleagues examined whether CAC (based on baseline computed tomography scans) predicted mortality from cardiovascular disease after adjusting for Framingham Risk Score in 1,123 patients (aged 34 to 86 years) with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

During an average follow-up of 7.4 years, the researchers found that 8 percent of patients died of cardiovascular causes. Cardiovascular mortality increased with increasing CAC: using CAC 0 to 9 as the reference group, the odds ratio increased from 2.93 for CAC 10 to 99 to 11.23 for CAC ≥1,000. The area under the curve was improved by the addition of CAC and was 0.70 for the Framingham risk score without CAC and 0.75 with CAC. Net reclassification improvement with the addition of CAC was 0.13.

"In type 2 diabetes mellitus, CAC predicts cardiovascular disease mortality and meaningfully reclassifies participants, suggesting clinical utility as a risk stratification tool in a population already at increased cardiovascular disease risk," Agarwal and colleagues conclude.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
Researchers assessed the effect of seizure status and severity, medication use, mental health indicators, parental support, and other factors on self-reported quality of life in children with epilepsy.
A group of international researchers led by Luosheng Li, MD, of the Rolf Luft Research Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology at the Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, recently demonstrated that age-dependent decline in insulin secretion (and thus glucose homeostasis) from the beta cell in experimental mice models is associated with subtle changes in Ca2+ dynamics.
For patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), the right treatment can make a world of difference in the management of their condition. A recent study looked at how effective inhaled budesonide and systemic methylprednisolone can be for those patients.
More Reading