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Diabetes Not Correlated with Adverse Outcomes After Knee Replacement

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, diabetes (with or without poor glycemic control) is not associated with adverse surgical outcomes, according to research published online Feb. 27 in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

In an effort to examine the correlation between diabetes status and preoperative glycemic control with surgical outcomes, Annette L. Adams, PhD, MPH, from Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena, and colleagues conducted a retrospective review of 40,491 patients who underwent elective first primary total knee arthroplasty.

The researchers found that 18.7 percent of the patients had diabetes, 1.1 percent underwent revision arthroplasty, and 0.7 percent developed a deep infection. Compared with patients without diabetes, there was no significant correlation between controlled or uncontrolled diabetes with the risk of revision, deep infection, or deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

"No significantly increased risk of revision arthroplasty, deep infection, or deep venous thrombosis was found in patients with diabetes (as defined on the basis of preoperative hemoglobin A1c levels and other criteria) compared with patients without diabetes in the study population of patients who underwent elective total knee arthroplasty," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to an entity in the biomedical arena.

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