HCPLive Network

Displaying Exercise Needed to Burn Food Calories Effective in Youth

FRIDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Displaying the amount of exercise needed to burn off the calories of menu items may lead to lower-calorie food choices in young people, according to a study presented at Experimental Biology 2013, held from April 20 to 24 in Boston.

Ashlei James, from Texas Christian University, in Fort Worth, and colleagues randomly assigned 300 men and women (aged 18 to 30 years) to a menu without calorie labels (NCL; 99 participants), a menu with calorie labels (CL; 99), or a menu with labels on the minutes of brisk walking needed to burn the food calories (EL; 102). The same food/beverage options were listed on all menus.

The researchers observed a significant menu effect on both calories ordered and consumed. In the EL group compared to NCL group there were significantly fewer calories ordered (adjusted mean, 763 versus 902 kcal) and consumed (adjusted mean, 673 versus 770 kcal). The CL and the NCL groups did not differ significantly in the food calories ordered or consumed. Similarly, there was no difference between the CL and the EL groups. Post-lunch calorie intake did not differ by menu condition.

"This study suggests there are benefits to displaying exercise minutes to a group of young men and women. We can't generalize to a population over age 30, so we will further investigate this in an older and more diverse group," a coauthor said in a statement. "This is the first study to look at the effects of displaying minutes of brisk walking needed to burn food calories on the calories ordered and consumed."

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
Immune system proteins play a role in regulating the number of neural synapses, a research team from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego report. The finding could mean that one of these proteins—known as major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) could play a significant role in Alzheimer’s disease, type II diabetes and autism.
A new implantable eye device might make reading glasses a thing of the past, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, held from Oct. 18 to 21 in Chicago.
Interim study results presented at ACG 2014 indicate that treatment with vedolizumab safely and effectively maintains long-term clinical remission and response in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.
A man's caffeine intake could hamper the success of a couple's infertility treatment, while mild alcohol use by would-be fathers might help boost the odds of pregnancy through in vitro fertilization (IVF), according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, held from Oct. 18 to 22 in Honolulu.
A child receives the wrong medication or the wrong dosage every 8 minutes in the United States, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Pediatrics.
A three-minute diagnostic assessment (3D-Confusion Assessment Method) has high sensitivity and specificity for identifying delirium, according to a study published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.
In the era of rapidly improving cure rates for hepatitis C infection, has the importance of staging as part of treatment diminished?
More Reading