HCPLive Network

Drug Reduces Progression to Clinically Definite MS

Friday, April 20 (HealthDay News) --  As part of a Phase 3 trial, Mark Freedman, M.D., from the University of Ottawa in Canada, and colleagues randomly assigned 517 individuals who had a first clinical demyelinating event and brain lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to a subcutaneous serum-free formulation of IFN β-1a one or three times a week, or placebo. Placebo patients were switched to IFN β-1a three times a week after two years or after a diagnosis of clinically definite MS.

At three years, the researchers found that the probability of developing clinically definite MS was 41.3 percent for placebo patients switched to IFN β-1a, but was significantly lower for those who received IFN β-1a once a week (27.6 percent) or three times a week (27.1 percent). Similar results were found for the probability of a McDonald MS diagnosis, at 86.5, 79.1, and 66.8 percent, respectively.

"While doses three times a week and once a week equally delayed a clinically definite MS diagnosis without MRI measures, there were significantly more benefits in taking the drug three times a week compared with once a week when it came to brain lesion changes and other McDonald criteria for diagnosing MS," Freedman said in a statement.

The study was supported by Merck Serono S.A.

Press Release
More Information

Individuals suspected of having multiple sclerosis are less likely to be diagnosed with clinically definite disease if they soon start treatment with interferon β-1a, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, held from April 21 to 28 in New Orleans.




Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Further Reading
Emergency physicians may see an increase in heroin overdoses that are actually tied to acetyl fentanyl, a legal opiate with effects mirroring heroin.
As the days of the file folders crammed with patient information passes, the question becomes what doctors’ offices will look like in the digital age.
A few years ago the idea of physicians prescribing apps to their patients seemed ridiculous. However, health apps have become a large market and physicians are embracing them when interacting with patients.
Researchers have manufactured a peptide aimed to block modified proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, Lou Gehrig’s disease, and other conditions.
Diabetic neuropathic pain can be controlled with a low-fat vegan diet, according to research presented at the American Association of Diabetic Educators Annual Meeting.
Rescheduling hydrocodone combination products to the more-restrictive schedule II will impact clinicians and patients suffering with chronic pain, but will it have the desired effect on the misuse and abuse of these products?
Opioid use is common among disabled Medicare beneficiaries under 65 years of age, according to research published in the September issue of Medical Care.
More Reading