HCPLive Network

Exposure to Tamoxifen Causes CNS Cell Death

 
THURSDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Tamoxifen causes central nerve system (CNS) cell cytotoxicity, and MEK1/2 inhibition can prevent tamoxifen-induced cell death, according to a study published in the Sept. 18 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

Hsing-Yu Chen, from the University of Rochester Medical School in New York, and colleagues examined the impact of exposure to tamoxifen on CNS cell populations.

The researchers found that, in vitro, tamoxifen was cytotoxic for various CNS cell populations, and it was associated with increased cell death in the corpus callosum. In addition, tamoxifen was associated with reduced cell division in the mouse subventricular zone, the hippocampal dentate gyrus, and the corpus callosum. In vitro, MEK1/2 inhibition selectively rescued primary glial progenitors from tamoxifen cytotoxicity, while simultaneously enhancing the effect of tamoxifen on MCF7 luminal human breast cancer cells. In systematically treated mice, in vivo MEK1/2 inhibition prevented tamoxifen-induced cell death.

"Our results demonstrate unexpected cytotoxicity of this putatively benign anti-hormonal agent and offer a potential strategy for rescuing CNS cells from adverse effects of tamoxifen," the authors write.

Abstract 

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) 

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 
 

Further Reading
Otezla (apremilast) is an oral, selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate.
New research from Northwestern University has found that schools are woefully unprepared to deal with anaphylaxis and other life-threatening emergencies stemming from student allergies.
New research indicates that doctors who treat anaphylaxis with intravenous epinephrine rather than intramuscular or subcutaneous injections are increasing the risk that patients will suffer overdoses or other adverse reactions.
Anil Asgaonkar, MD, provides a basic overview of the signs, symptoms, and causes frequently associated with hyponatremia, and outlines several standard treatment approaches.
A new study warns that rising temperatures and altered weather patterns in the United States may soon exacerbate many existing health risks. The study was published online Sept. 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, ahead of the United Nations' summit on climate change, which kicks off Tuesday in New York City.
Metformin may raise the risk of low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) among patients with hypothyroidism, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.
Taking iron supplements as prescribed may play a role in reducing the risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to research published online Sept. 22 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
More Reading