HCPLive Network

Extended Sleep Time Linked to Reduced Pain Sensitivity

 
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Extending bedtime for sleepy healthy adults reduces daytime sleepiness and correlates with reduced pain sensitivity, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of SLEEP.

Timothy A. Roehrs, Ph.D., of the Sleep Disorders and Research Center at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, and colleagues conducted a study involving 18 health volunteers who had an average daily sleep latency of less than 8 minutes on the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Participants were randomized to four nights of extended sleep (10 hours per night) or four nights of their regular bedtime. Daytime sleepiness was measured on days one and four using the MSLT, and pain sensitivity was assessed using finger withdrawal latency pain testing to a radiant heat stimulus.

The researchers found that those in the extended sleep group slept an average of 1.8 hours more per night compared with those who continued their usual regular bedtime, and their average daily sleep latency increased on the MSLT. In the extended sleep group, finger withdrawal latency was also increased, indicative of a reduction in pain sensitivity. During the four experimental nights, the increase in sleep time correlated with improvement on the MSLT, which was associated with decreased sensitivity to pain.

"The current results suggest that the increased pain sensitivity of the sleepy individuals is the result of their underlying sleepiness, which the results of this study show is a state and not a trait phenomenon," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved today Xtoro (finafloxacinotic suspension), a novel drug treatment for acute otitis externa, otherwise known as swimmer’s ear, an infection within the outer ear and ear canal, typically caused by bacteria festered in the ear canal.
Congress’s new 2015 budget bill effectively lifts the federal ban on medical marijuana. A little-noticed section of the bill bars the federal government from using federal funds to prevent the “distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana” in states where medical marijuana is legal.
A support group developed by a hospital in New York has shown that patients with rheumatoid arthritis can see their condition improve by not only addressing the physical symptoms but the psychological issues as well.
More Reading