HCPLive Network

FDA Approves Ravicti for Urea Cycle Disorders

 
FDA Approves Ravicti for Urea Cycle DisordersFRIDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Ravicti (glycerol phenylbutyrate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat certain urea cycle disorders (UCDs) in people 2 years and older.

These inherited conditions involve a lack of enzymes that help the body remove ammonia from the blood. In people with UCDs, ammonia build-up can lead to coma, brain damage, or death, the FDA said Friday in a news release.

Ravicti is a liquid taken three times daily with meals. It's been approved for people whose disorders cannot be managed by a protein-restricted diet or amino acid supplements alone, the agency said.

Ravicti was compared to another UCD drug in a clinical study involving 44 adults. The most common side effects of the new drug were diarrhea, flatulence, and headache.

Ravicti is marketed by Hyperion Therapeutics, based in San Francisco.
 

More Information

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
Suggestions provided to protect the medical practice from legal action by terminated employee
It will take some time before research programs return to normal at the U.S. National Institutes of Health after the end of the federal government shutdown, officials say.
Even in a time of declining reimbursements, smart employers should know how to motivate and retain superstar employees in their practice.
US consumers who sign up for health insurance by March 31 won't face tax penalties for being uninsured during the first three months of 2014.
Aspiring doctors are optimistic about the future of medicine, according to a report published by the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists.
US health officials announced Thursday a plan to phase out heart-harmful trans fats in processed foods and restaurant fare.
Although there may be a limited supply of physicians in some rural areas, little difference is found in the amount of healthcare received by Medicare beneficiaries for rural versus urban areas within the same region, according to research published in the November issue of Health Affairs.
More Reading