HCPLive Network

Flu Vaccine Up Among Medical Staff When They Believe It Works

Monday, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Josien Riphagen-Dalhuisen, M.D., of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of the literature and identified 13 studies with data to assist in determining predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination in hospital HCWs.

The researchers found that hospital HCWs were at least twice as likely to receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if they knew the vaccine to be effective, were willing to prevent influenza transmission, believed that influenza is highly contagious and that prevention is important, and had a family that typically is vaccinated.

"We therefore recommend targeting these predictors when developing new influenza vaccination implementation strategies for hospital HCWs," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital health care workers are more likely to receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if they believe it works and are committed to preventing this highly contagious virus, according to research published in the April issue of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.


Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
People with diabetes are less likely to take their diabetes medications if they've been diagnosed with cancer, researchers report. The findings were published online Jan. 28 in Diabetologia.
For liver transplantation recipients with model for end-stage liver disease scores above 11, survival benefit increases with decreasing serum sodium values, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in Liver Transplantation.
Implementation of a national screening program in the Netherlands increased the prenatal detection rate of congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a study published online Jan. 27 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.
More Reading