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From the Literature: Alzheimer's Disease

Regional Differences in MRI Detection of Amyloid Plaques in AD Transgenic Mouse Brain
Journal: Neuroimage (August 20, 2010)
Authors: Wengenack T, Reyes D, Curran G, et al.
Purpose: To use “five-way anatomic spatial co-registration of MR images with three different histological techniques” to reveal “properties of amyloid plaques in AD transgenic mouse brain… that may explain their variable visibility in gradient- and spin-echo MR images,” as most MRI studies that attempt to detect plaques in AD transgenic mouse brains have “ployed techniques that exploit the paramagnetic effect of iron and have had mixed results.”
Results: In the MR imaging of human AD plaque, MRI methods might eventually be more successful if they rely less on iron magnetic susceptibility effect. This is especially believed by the authors because “human AD plaques more closely resemble the cortical and hippocampal plaques of AD transgenic mice than thalamic plaques.
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Relative Capability of MR Imaging and FDG PET to Depict Changes Associated with Prodromal and Early Alzheimer Disease
Journal: Radiology (September 2010)
Authors: Karow D, McEvoy L, Fennema-Notestine C, et al.
Purpose: “To quantify the effect sizes of regional metabolic and morphometric measures in patients with preclinical and mild Alzheimer disease (AD) to aid in the identification of noninvasive biomarkers for the early detection of AD.”
Results: No evidence was found that flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is more sensitive to preclinical and mild AD degeneration than is MR imaging. Thus, for early detection of AD, MR imaging findings might be more practical as clinical biomarkers.
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Further Reading
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Hypoglycemia related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) doesn't appear to impact brain pathology, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Diabetes Care.
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have become significant and costly problems—so significant, in fact, that many patients have a basic knowledge of MRSA just from news reports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer a large selection of free tools to educate the public about MRSA and VRE.
New York City has its first case of Ebola, confirmed tonight in Craig Spencer, MD, an emergency medicine specialist who recently returned from a volunteer stint caring for Ebola patients in Guinea, Africa for Doctors Without Borders. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene released a statement earlier today that Spencer, who works at New York Hospital/Columbia-Presbyterian in Manhattan had been rushed to Bellevue Hospital Center after he became ill with a high fever and gastro-intestinal symptoms. Mayor Bill Blasio provided further details at a news conference this evening.
In what could be New York City’s first case of Ebola, a doctor identified by the NY Post as Craig Spencer, 33, MD an emergency medicine physician at New York Hospital/Columbia-Presbyterian was rushed to a special Ebola unit at city-run Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan. Spencer returned 10 days ago from a stint as a volunteer with Doctors without Borders, caring for Ebola victims in Guinea, one of three West African nations with major outbreaks.
After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests. The report was published online Oct. 22 in Neurology.
The US health care system ranks last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
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