HCPLive Network

Healthcare Expenditure Has Slowed in the US

WEDNESDAY, July 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The growth in US healthcare expenditure has slowed in recent years, coming some way toward closing the gap with other countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), according to an article in the health of Americans series published online July 1 in The Lancet.

Noting that healthcare expenditure growth has slowed dramatically in the United States in recent years, Luca Lorenzoni, from the OECD in Paris, and colleagues reviewed expenditure trends and key policies in the United States and five other high-spending OECD countries since 2000.

The authors note that much of the difference between the United States and other high-spending counties can be explained by higher health-sector prices, and that price dynamics are mainly responsible for the expenditure growth slowdown. Expenditure growth was similar in the United States and in other counties, although other countries did not face the same challenges in health coverage and could draw from a broader set of policies to control expenditure. Some of the factors responsible for the slowdown in health care expenditure included increasing rate of generic drug use, a shift from inpatient to outpatient hospital care, and price control measures.

"Tightening Medicare and Medicaid price controls on plans and providers, and leveraging the scale of the public programs to increase efficiency in financing and care delivery, might prevent a future economic recovery from offsetting the slowdown in health sector prices and expenditure growth," the authors write.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Assessment of long-term data on treatment utility demonstrates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interferon-beta and glatiramer acetate for multiple sclerosis.
Treatment with Sativex oromucosal spray produces significant reductions in spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with placebo, but researchers reported no significant difference between the two in neurophysiologic measures.
Results from the RADIANCE study show that treatment with the selective S1P1 receptor modulator RPC1063 is associated with significant reductions in GD-enhancing lesions on MRI, as well as new or enlarging T2 lesions, compared with placebo.
Patients treated for two years with a combination of glatiramer acetate and estriol experienced a one-third reduction in relapse rate compared with patients who received glatiramer acetate and placebo.
Patients with multiple sclerosis who received thrice-weekly injections of glatiramer acetate 40 mg/ml reported increased satisfaction with their treatment and experienced lower rates of moderate and severe injections site reactions and other adverse events.
Five-year data from the ENDORSE study shows that patients with multiple sclerosis who continued treatment, or who switched from another medication, experienced improved NEDA outcomes.
Finances, 401(K)’s and investment strategies are likely the first things to come to mind when many working-age adults think about retirement. But a new survey finds retirees think first about a different subject.
More Reading