HCPLive Network

Hearing Loss Linked to Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients

 
MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, hearing loss is independently associated with incident cognitive impairment; and about 11 percent of those aged 80 or older have dual sensory impairment (DSI), according to two studies published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Frank R. Lin, M.D., Ph.D., from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, and colleagues examined whether hearing loss is independently correlated with accelerated cognitive decline among 1,984 older adults without prevalent cognitive impairment at baseline. The researchers found that, compared to those with normal hearing, among the 1,162 individuals with baseline hearing loss, the annual rates of cognitive decline were 41 percent greater on the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score and 32 percent greater on the Digit Symbol Substitution test scores. Compared to those with normal hearing, individuals with hearing loss at baseline had a significantly increased risk (24 percent greater) for incident cognitive impairment.

Bonnielin K. Swenor, M.P.H., from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, and colleagues examined the prevalence of DSI in hearing and vision using data from the 1999 to 2006 cycles of the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. The researchers found that approximately 1.5 million Americans aged 20 years and older had DSI. The prevalence of DSI was less than 1 percent for individuals younger than 70 years and was 11.3 percent for those aged 80 or older. Only 19 percent of those aged 80 or older were free of any sensory impairment.

"Concurrent vision impairment could potentially accelerate the rate of cognitive decline and dementia previously reported in individuals with hearing impairment alone," Swenor and colleagues conclude.

An author associated with both studies disclosed financial ties to Pfizer and Cochlear Europe.
 

Abstract - Lin
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
 
Abstract - Swenor
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
 
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
Citing a “public health epidemic” of death and addiction related to use of prescription opioids, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) calls for a multi-pronged approach to curbing prescriptions. But the group stresses that finding ways to help patients in chronic pain is worthwhile and difficult.
A patient at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for the deadly virus.
Kevin Skole, MD is a board-certified gastroenterologist practicing in central New Jersey, part of the gastroenterology division of Princeton Healthcare Affiliated Physicians, a multi-specialty medical practice based out of the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro (see www.princetonhcs.org). He discusses the increased incidence, risk factors, and prevention of Clostridium Difficile (C. diff) infection.
There is a wide variety of evidence to support benefits of low-fat diets versus low carbohydrate diets and vice versa. As of today, no one can tell us with certainty whether the well-worn dictum "calories in calories out" is really true. The National Weight Control Registry data give us some confidence in recommending that to lose weight most people need to alter their diet to reduce calories, and need to exercise on a near-daily basis.
Cannabis users who acknowledge their problem and report withdrawal symptoms are likely to increase abstinence over a 12-month period, according to research published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.
Device therapy eligibility requirements are underestimated using 2D echocardiography compared to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, according to a study from the Netherlands Heart Journal.
Omega-3 supplementation can help reduce behavioral issues in adolescents who may be particularly prone to oxytocin receptor gene methylation.
More Reading