HCPLive Network

Heart Failure Total Cost Estimated at $70 Billion by 2030

THURSDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- The impact of heart failure is likely to increase, with more than eight million U.S. adults anticipated to have heart failure by 2030, at an estimated total cost of $70 billion, according to a study published online April 24 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Paul A. Heidenreich, MD, from Stanford University, in California, and colleagues estimated the epidemiology and future costs of heart failure from 2012 to 2030, based on a model that assumes heart failure prevalence will remain constant and that the costs and technological innovation will continue to increase at the same rate.

The researchers projected that more than eight million people in the Unites States will have heart failure by 2030. The direct costs of medications are expected to increase from $21 billion in 2012 to $53 billion in 2030. The estimated total costs, including indirect costs, are expected to increase from $31 billion to $70 billion. Assuming all costs of cardiac care for patients with heart failure are attributable to heart failure, and not to comorbid conditions, the cost estimates projected for 2030 would be $160 billion in direct costs.

"Assuming continuation in present practice patterns, the cost of heart failure is projected to increase markedly over the next 18 years based on demographic changes in the population," the authors write. "The cost would be substantial, with each U.S. adult, on average, paying $244 annually by 2030 to care for the 10 million patients with heart failure."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
As more studies have demonstrated potential therapeutic applications for marijuana, public opinion regarding medical and recreational marijuana use has shifted. One such study recently published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology revealed medical marijuana is potentially beneficial for digestive disorders and gastrointestinal symptoms.
Is one beta blocker better than another for patients born with long QT syndrome? In a report published Sept 23 in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology Abeer Abu-Zeitone, PhD, and colleagues found that in their study group, nadolol worked best at preventing a recurrent serious cardiac event and that propranolol, the oldest beta-blocker available, did the worst. The researchers also evaluated how patients had fared with atenolol and metoprolol. But in an editorial commenting on the findings, Arthur Wilde, MD, PhD, and Michael Ackerman MD, PhD, questioned the study’s methodology and predicted that many heart centers will continue to use propranolol.
The American College of Cardiologists (ACC) has had a change of heart. The group is now recommending doctors treating heart attack patients for arterial blockages should treat lesions in both cardiac arteries, not just the “culprit” artery that led to the MI. In a statement Sept. 22, the ACA cited new information—reported Sept. 5 by HCPLive.com—from a UK study showing that it pays to do the more extensive procedure.
Enterovirus-D68 could soon be in the rearview mirror, according to a Hartford, CT, pediatric intensivist who has treated more than 20 children hospitalized with the infection. “We may have plateaued,” said Christopher Carroll, MD, an asthma specialist at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center. While children are still being admitted for respiratory problems, “Now it’s more a mix of symptoms, not those of classic enterovirus.” Though he could not say for certain the outbreak has peaked, he did say that “things are not continuing to get worse.”
The World Health Organization continued its efforts to battle the ongoing Ebola outbreak with a second meeting of its Emergency Committee tackling the virus.
Counseling at-risk teens and adults to change risky behavior is an effective way to reduce the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, according to the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The group is updating its guidelines for primary care physicians to recommend they offer appropriate patients such behavioral advice. The task force also calls for routine screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea for sexually active teens and women up to age 24. Older women who are pregnant or may be at risk of infection due to a variety of sexual behaviors—such as having multiple partners or exchanging sex for money or drugs—should also be screened, the USPSTF said.
Advances in knowledge surrounding gastrointestinal conditions have paved the way for improvements in Crohn’s disease (CD) treatment. To aid clinicians in managing patients with CD, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) created a clinical decision tool to effectively guide gastroenterologists throughout their decision-making process.
More Reading