HCPLive Network

Heart Failure Total Cost Estimated at $70 Billion by 2030

THURSDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- The impact of heart failure is likely to increase, with more than eight million U.S. adults anticipated to have heart failure by 2030, at an estimated total cost of $70 billion, according to a study published online April 24 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Paul A. Heidenreich, MD, from Stanford University, in California, and colleagues estimated the epidemiology and future costs of heart failure from 2012 to 2030, based on a model that assumes heart failure prevalence will remain constant and that the costs and technological innovation will continue to increase at the same rate.

The researchers projected that more than eight million people in the Unites States will have heart failure by 2030. The direct costs of medications are expected to increase from $21 billion in 2012 to $53 billion in 2030. The estimated total costs, including indirect costs, are expected to increase from $31 billion to $70 billion. Assuming all costs of cardiac care for patients with heart failure are attributable to heart failure, and not to comorbid conditions, the cost estimates projected for 2030 would be $160 billion in direct costs.

"Assuming continuation in present practice patterns, the cost of heart failure is projected to increase markedly over the next 18 years based on demographic changes in the population," the authors write. "The cost would be substantial, with each U.S. adult, on average, paying $244 annually by 2030 to care for the 10 million patients with heart failure."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
Results of a large international study known as SIGNIFY showed ivabradine offered no benefit to patients who had stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure (CHF).
Novartis plans to soon file a new drug application with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its investigational heart failure drug LCZ696. A report showing the drug works better than enalapril to prevent adverse cardiac events was released at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona, Spain Aug. 30 and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).
Having regular family meals may help protect teens from the harmful mental health effects of "cyberbullying," a new study suggests. The study was published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Pediatrics.
The quality of Americans' diets has improved somewhat but remains poor overall, and dietary disparity between the rich and poor is growing, a new study shows. Education also played a role in dietary quality, which was lowest and improved more slowly among people who had 12 years or less of school, according to the study published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
New research suggests that oral immunotherapy may trigger anaphylaxis in an unusually high percentage of asthmatic teenagers with high-risk food allergies who failed to adhere to their management plan.
For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, prehospital administration of ticagrelor is not associated with improved coronary reperfusion, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was published to coincide with the annual European Society of Cardiology Congress, held from Aug. 30 to Sept. 3 in Barcelona, Spain.
For patients with stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure, ivabradine does not improve outcomes, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was published to coincide with the annual European Society of Cardiology Congress, held from Aug. 30 to Sept. 3 in Barcelona, Spain.
More Reading