HCPLive Network

Increase in Proportion of Livers Not Used for Transplantation

 
TUESDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of livers not used for transplantation is increasing, with the primary causes being donation after cardiac death (DCD), older donor age, greater body mass index (BMI), and increasing diabetes prevalence, according to research published in the January issue of Liver Transplantation.

Eric S. Orman, M.D., of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues used data from the United Network for Organ Sharing database for 107,259 organ donors to examine trends in donor liver utilization and the association between donor characteristics and liver nonuse between 2004 and 2010.

The researchers found that the number of unused livers decreased from 66 percent of donors in 1988 to 15 percent in 2004, and then increased to 21 percent in 2010. Over time, donor age, BMI, and the prevalence of diabetes and DCD all increased, and these factors correlated with liver nonuse. The odds ratio for nonuse was highest for DCD and increased from 5.53 in 2004 to 21.31 in 2011. Overall, in 2010, DCD accounted for 28 percent of all liver nonuse, up from 9 percent in 2004.

"A better understanding of the reasons for the increasing proportion of DCD in particular is critical to understanding this declining utilization," the authors write. "These trends, along with stagnant donation rates, suggest significant declines in liver transplant availability in the coming years."
 

Abstract
Full Text


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
The fate of Bentley, the pet dog of hospitalized Dallas Ebola victim Nina Pham has been of great interest to animal lovers. But scientists are also paying attention. No one expects the dog to get sick, but many are curious whether he will show signs of being infected. Dogs can apparently carry the Ebola virus without getting the illness. The question is whether they can transmit it to people.
Study results show that patients suffering from active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at risk for poor prognoses following an initial myocardial infarction.
New research provides some of the first concrete support for a treatment guideline that has long been recommended on grounds of common sense alone: Patients who suffer severe allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis should follow up on their emergency room care by seeing an allergist or immunologist.
Children may be at lower risk of Ebola virus disease, but physicians should be aware of the signs and symptoms, according to a viewpoint piece published online Oct. 17 in JAMA Pediatrics.
Inflammatory bowel diseases have an impact on the prognosis of multiple sclerosis, according to a study published in PLOS One.
The brains of children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are slower to develop some key connections, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury is mainly caused by antimicrobials and herbal and dietary supplements, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, held from Oct. 17 to 22 in Philadelphia.
More Reading