HCPLive Network

Kynamro Approved for Genetic Condition Tied to Cholesterol

 
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Kynamro (mipomersen sodium) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), a rare inherited condition in which the body can't remove low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from the blood, as an addition to lipid-lowering medications and diet.

Many people with HoFH have a heart attack and die before age 30, the FDA said in a news release. HoFH affects approximately one in every one million people in the United States. Kynamro is a once-weekly injection designed to lower creation of blood lipid particles that ultimately form LDL, the agency said.

The drug was clinically evaluated among 51 people with HoFH. Among Kynamro users, LDL levels fell an average of about 25 percent during the first 26 weeks, the FDA said. The drug will carry a "black box" label warning of possible liver abnormalities that could lead to progressive liver disease.

More common side effects noted during clinical testing included injection-site reactions, flu-like symptoms, nausea, headache, and elevated liver enzymes.

Kynamro is produced by Genzyme Corp., of Cambridge, Mass.
 

More Information


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
Treatment failure can be caused by a variety of factors, including misdiagnosis of the primary psychiatric complaint, the presence of one or more comorbid conditions, and nonadherence to medication plans.
When treating patients who have been diagnosed with cancer, you should consult with their oncologist to brainstorm interventions that can help your patient have the best possible quality of life.
Prolonged exposure therapy can help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder overcome the fear, anxiety, and depression that can lead to avoidance behaviors and other responses that negatively impact quality of life.
App will help patients with diabetes log their hypoglycemic events and achieve better control of these events by becoming more aware of preceding signs and symptoms.
Provocative research raises the question of whether we should we look at Alzheimer’s disease as “type 3 diabetes.”
Presentation at CMHC 2014 provides updates on emerging classes of diabetes treatment, including preliminary data from current clinical trials.
In remarks delivered at the American Academy of Family Physicians 2014 Assembly, HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell spoke about the ongoing response to the Ebola outbreak, improving health care delivery, the Affordable Care Act, and the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative.
More Reading