HCPLive Network

Liver Transplant Outcomes No Worse With Echo Abnormalities

 
FRIDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Intracardiac shunts (ICSs), diagnosed using an echocardiogram, or mild or moderate pulmonary hypertension (PH), do not affect short- or long-term mortality in liver transplant candidates, according to research published online in the Dec. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Matthew E. Harinstein, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study involving 502 consecutive patients (318 men) with end-stage liver disease who had echocardiography prior to liver transplantation. Contrast echocardiography was used to diagnose ICSs, and PH was defined as pulmonary artery systolic pressure >40 mm Hg.

The researchers found that more than 50 percent of the study population had at least two cardiovascular risk factors: ICSs were found in 16 percent, PH in 25 percent, and intrapulmonary shunts in 41 percent of liver transplant candidates. Short-(30-day) and long-term (mean, 41 months) mortality was not associated with ICSs or PH. Furthermore, no strokes occurred in those with ICSs.

"In conclusion, structural differences exist between various end-stage liver disease diagnoses. ICSs diagnosed by echocardiography are not associated with an increased risk of perioperative stroke or increased mortality. A diagnosis of mild or moderate PH on baseline echocardiogram is not associated with worse outcomes and requires further assessment," the authors write. "Based on these findings, patients should not be excluded from consideration for liver transplantation based solely on the presence of an ICS or PH."
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
In this segment, Dr. Peter Salgo asks Dr. Alfred Deluca to "talk about some of the assurances about Ebola we’ve heard from public health officials, versus some of the truths as you see it."
With the Ebola outbreak now reaching the United States, news reports of confirmed, suspected, and possible cases of the deadly virus have made the virus Topic A. From serious medical journal articles to bizarre postings on Twitter, Ebola news was everywhere. In Princeton, NJ, Ebola panic resulted in some residents tacking up “wanted” posters for NBC News Correspondent Nancy Snyderman, who was recently given state orders to stay home until OCt. 22 because she may have been exposed to the virus during a reporting trip.
Differential expression of long noncoding RNAs identified in prostate cancer cell lines, patient tissue samples, and patient urine samples can detect prostate cancer, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.
For patients with node-negative breast cancer (NNBC), the 70-gene signature is unlikely to be cost-effective for guiding adjuvant chemotherapy decision making, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
A Manhattan Research survey recently found that many physicians believe digital communication technologies, including mobile apps, can be used to improve patient outcomes, according to an article published Oct. 8 in Medical Economics.
Cumulative years of regular endurance exercise are associated with an increased risk for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.
Simulation-based training improves clinicians' performance of gastrointestinal endoscopy in both test settings and clinical practice, according to research published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
More Reading