HCPLive Network

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Improves Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

FRIDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) can provide significant and clinically meaningful improvement in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, according to a pilot study published online April 17 in Depression and Anxiety.

Anthony P. King, PhD, from the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor, and colleagues enrolled consecutive patients seeking treatment for chronic PTSD at a VA outpatient clinic in either eight-week MBCT groups, modified for PTSD (four groups; 20 participants), or brief treatment-as-usual (TAU) comparison group interventions (three groups; 17 participants). Clinician administered PTSD scales (CAPS) were performed on all patients as pre- and post-therapy psychological assessments. Self-report measures (PTSD diagnostic scale [PDS] and posttraumatic cognitions inventory [PTCI]) were administered in the MBCT group.

The researchers observed significant improvement in PTSD in the MBCT group but not the TAU group. There was a significant Condition × Time interaction. The 15 participants who completed MBCT showed good compliance with assigned homework exercises as well as significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PTSD symptom severity in CAPS and PDS (particularly in avoidance/numbing symptoms) and reduced PTSD-relevant cognitions in PTCI (self-blame).

"These data suggest group MBCT as an acceptable brief intervention/adjunctive therapy for combat PTSD, with potential for reducing avoidance symptom cluster and PTSD cognitions," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
Research presented at the European League Against Rheumatism’s Annual Meeting indicates comorbid diabetes may be linked to increased osteoarthritis pain.
Calculation and interpretation of the anion gap is extremely useful in the evaluation and treatment of the patient with metabolic acidosis. In this installment, we look at case examples involving patients with multiple sclerosis and urosepsis; COPD, diabetes, and renal failure; and type 1 diabetes.
Twice-yearly visits to the doctor can help keep hypertension under control better than only seeing the doctor once a year, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Circulation.
Medications commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease may raise the risk of impulse control disorders such as compulsive gambling, compulsive shopping, and/or hypersexuality, according to a new review published online Oct. 20 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
A state law that requires plaintiffs to release relevant protected health information before proceeding with allegations of medical liability has been upheld by a federal appeals court, according to the American Medical Association.
Immune system proteins play a role in regulating the number of neural synapses, a research team from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego report. The finding could mean that one of these proteins—known as major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) could play a significant role in Alzheimer’s disease, type II diabetes and autism.
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) may have more in common with Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease than previously thought, a bi-coastal team of chemists reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
More Reading