HCPLive Network

More Than Two Million People Have Signed Up for ACA Coverage

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 2.2 million Americans had selected health plans through the federal and state marketplaces as of late December, and nearly one in four was a young adult, the Obama administration disclosed Monday.

"The numbers show that there is a very strong national demand for affordable health care made possible by the Affordable Care Act," Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said during a news conference Monday afternoon. "More than six million Americans have now either signed up for private health insurance plans or for Medicaid coverage through the marketplace," she said.

Twenty-four percent of people who chose a plan were in the key 18-to-34-year-old demographic. Attracting enough young adults to the mix should keep health insurance rates more affordable, experts say. Young people tend to be healthier, helping to offset the risk of covering older, sicker adults. "For the 18-34 age band, we would want at least 32 percent of the adult sign-ups [people ages 18 to 64] to be in that category," David Axene, president and consulting actuary at Axene Health Partners, of Murrieta, Calif. told HealthDay. "Materially less than that leads to subsidy concerns," he added.

Sebelius highlighted a rosier statistic during Monday's news conference, noting that 30 percent of enrollees were under age 35. But that figure includes people 17 and younger who are not yet considered adults.

Full Article


Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.



Further Reading
Research indicates that patients with type 2 diabetics mellitus and low testosterone levels are 6 times more likely than those with normal testosterone levels to have increased carotid artery intima media thickness (CIMT) and decreased endothelial function.
Distal radius fracture—also called a wrist fracture by patients—is common. Its incidence is expected to increase in the next 20 years, since our population is aging and the risk of this specific fracture increases in patients with metabolic disorders, including osteoporosis. However, the health care community has yet to reach a consensus regarding indications for surgery, and there is insufficient data to identify a preferred operative technique.
Team-based feedback has the potential to improve surgeons’ relationships with coworkers and patients. The clinical implication: using such feedback to improve less-than-optimal behaviors could increase practice reimbursement under the “pay-for-professionalism” system.
More Reading