HCPLive Network

Most Docs Find MBA Training Advantageous to Their Careers

TUESDAY, July 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Graduates with dual training in medicine and business increasingly pursue leadership roles and report greater career acceleration, according to a study published online June 20 in Academic Medicine.

Mitesh S. Patel, MD, MBA, from University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, surveyed physician graduates from the Wharton School MBA Program in Heath Care Management at the University of Pennsylvania from 1981 to 2010. Survey participants were queried regarding their perceptions of the effect of MBA training on their career and professional development.

The researchers found that based on 148 responses (from 247 graduates; 133 of whom completed free-text responses), the number of males and the number of physician graduates who entered residency training declined slightly over time. Nearly half of respondents (24 of 52) within their first decade after graduation reported clinical practice as their primary work sector, compared to 15 of 38 respondents 11 to 20 years after graduation and five of 26 respondents 21 to 30 years after graduation. The benefits of career acceleration, professional flexibility, and credibility in multidisciplinary domains were noted as positives of MBA training. The opportunity cost of time and how peers in one discipline may negatively perceive the role of the other discipline's degree were cited as the few negative remarks.

"Graduates with an MD and MBA report mostly positive attitudes towards their training, and many are pursuing leadership and primarily nonclinical roles later in their careers," the authors write.

Abstract
 
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Even though the active ingredient in marijuana can be associated with memory impairment, it may slow or halt Alzheimer’s disease.
Men who are socially well-integrated show more than a 2-fold reduced risk of suicide, according to a longitudinal study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
When a patient gets bitten by a dog, there can be many issues doctors need to confront as treatment begins. Two doctors shared their experiences of a patient who was bitten by a dog and still had symptoms including swelling and pain 2 weeks after his K-9 encounter.
A prognostic model has been developed and validated which has adequate discrimination for major outcomes in type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in Diabetologia.
The costs of Medicare associated with Sovaldi (sofosbuvir), an emerging hepatitis C drug, will vary depending on how many people are given the treatment, a blog in Health Affairs found.
For patients with cancer, factors associated with late admission to hospice have been identified, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Healthcare practices continue to suffer from embezzlement problems. While there is no such thing as a perfect system to prevent embezzlers, there are ways to deter them.
More Reading