HCPLive Network

Most Patients Are Unaware of Out-of-Pocket Costs for Prostate Cancer Treatment

 
FRIDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with localized prostate cancer know little about the out-of-pocket expenses (OOPE) of the different treatments, and would not have chosen a different treatment even if they had known the actual OOPE of their treatment, according to a study published in the December issue of Urology.

Olivia S. Jung, from Harvard Business School in Boston, and colleagues conducted a qualitative research study involving 41 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer enrolled from the urology and radiology practices of the University of Pennsylvania. Participants completed a semi-structured interview and questionnaire discussing the burden of OOPE, its effect on treatment decisions, and prior knowledge of OOPE.

Based on qualitative assessment, the researchers identified five major themes: "my insurance takes care of it;" "health is more important than cost;" "I did not look into it;" "I cannot afford it but would have chosen the same treatment;" and "it is not my doctor's business." Ninety-three percent of patients reported that, even if they had known the actual OOPE of their treatment, they would not have chosen a different treatment. A socioeconomically heterogeneous group reported feeling burdened by OOPE, and their choice of treatment was unaffected. Before choosing their treatment, only two of the patients reported knowing a lot about the likely OOPE for different treatments.

"Among insured patients with prostate cancer treated at a large academic medical center, few had knowledge of OOPE before making treatment choices," the authors write.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Further Reading
Interim study results presented at ACG 2014 indicate that treatment with vedolizumab safely and effectively maintains long-term clinical remission and response in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.
A child receives the wrong medication or the wrong dosage every 8 minutes in the United States, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Pediatrics.
A three-minute diagnostic assessment (3D-Confusion Assessment Method) has high sensitivity and specificity for identifying delirium, according to a study published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.
In the era of rapidly improving cure rates for hepatitis C infection, has the importance of staging as part of treatment diminished?
The fate of Bentley, the pet dog of hospitalized Dallas Ebola victim Nina Pham has been of great interest to animal lovers. But scientists are also paying attention. No one expects the dog to get sick, but many are curious whether he will show signs of being infected. Dogs can apparently carry the Ebola virus without getting the illness. The question is whether they can transmit it to people.
Study results show that patients suffering from active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at risk for poor prognoses following an initial myocardial infarction.
New research provides some of the first concrete support for a treatment guideline that has long been recommended on grounds of common sense alone: Patients who suffer severe allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis should follow up on their emergency room care by seeing an allergist or immunologist.
More Reading