HCPLive Network

NINDS Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page

Find a detailed description of deep brain stimulation (DBS), a “surgical procedure used to treat a variety of disabling neurological symptoms-most commonly the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), such as tremor, rigidity, stiffness, slowed movement, and walking problems” at this site from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Offered in outlined format are a description of the procedure, treatment, prognosis of patients who’ve received it, and research being conducted. Links to clinical trials currently recruiting patients with this and similar disorders, journal abstracts, and press releases dealing with this condition can be found on the left sidebar of this site.
Click here to access this third-party resource.


More Resources for Patients with Parkinson's Disease


Further Reading
Review by a German commission also found major benefits in patients who had not responded to prior treatment with other medications.
Physicians are often tasked with explaining vaccination safety to concerned parents. Parental fears that routine vaccines can trigger neurological diseases have led to decreasing vaccination rates in some countries and subsequent outbreaks of preventable illnesses. A team of Dutch researchers has debunked the idea that vaccination can cause severe epilepsy
More than one-quarter of hospital medicine services were rated by ordering physicians as at least a partially defensive order, according to a research letter published online Sept. 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
Paul Wicks, PhD, comments on physicians’ acceptance of technological evolution in data collection at the 2014 Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS Meeting in Boston.
Paul Wicks, PhD, discusses the surge in Internet-savvy patients at the 2014 Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS Meeting in Boston.
Paul Wicks, PhD, discusses the surge in Internet-savvy patients at the 2014 Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS Meeting in Boston.
A compound known as P7C3-S243 appears to keep axons from degenerating after a blast injury, a University of Iowa mouse study has found. “We propose that P7C3-S243 serves as a chemical scaffold upon which new drugs can be designed to treat patients with condition of axonal degradation such as occurs in traumatic brain injury or other neurodegenerative disease,” the researchers wrote
More Reading