HCPLive Network

NINDS Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page

Find a detailed description of deep brain stimulation (DBS), a “surgical procedure used to treat a variety of disabling neurological symptoms-most commonly the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), such as tremor, rigidity, stiffness, slowed movement, and walking problems” at this site from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Offered in outlined format are a description of the procedure, treatment, prognosis of patients who’ve received it, and research being conducted. Links to clinical trials currently recruiting patients with this and similar disorders, journal abstracts, and press releases dealing with this condition can be found on the left sidebar of this site.
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Further Reading
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