HCPLive Network

New Health Action Apps Available Through iPad and iPhone, Catered to Several Chronic Conditions

Gaiam, Inc., a distributor of lifestyle media and fitness accessories, has announced its introduction of several new health action plans for the iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch. The focus of these action plans will be to aid patients who suffer from symptoms of chronic disorders, such as Fibromyalgia.

Other ailments that these new plans will focus on include arthritis, weight loss, type 2 diabetes, cardiology, insomnia, hypertension, chronic back pain, menopause, and I.B.S.

These new applications came about through a collaborative effort between Gaiam and Mayo Clinic. Bill Sondheim, the President of Gaiam, reported, "We worked with an interdisciplinary team of experts at Mayo Clinic to develop content that offers a holistic approach to dealing with everyday ailments, and are thrilled to make this available in a new, technologically-advanced format.”

"Our goal in working with Mayo Clinic was to create a program that takes a combined approach to providing medical and overall health and wellness practices that can be incorporated into a person's everyday life, for longer, more sustaining results,” continued Sondheim.

The following applications are the result of this effort:
  • On-the-go video playback
  • No WIFI required after initial install for watching anywhere
  • Chapter driven and Interactive search to find sections quickly 
  • Note taking
 Dr. Brent Bauer, Director, Complementary and Integrative Medicine at Mayo Clinic, “hosts” every application; further, each app is catered to the specific condition the purchaser suffers from, and begins with an introduction by a Mayo Clinic specialist who details necessary information about the condition, as well as provides suggestions for conventional and alternative therapy options.

Following the intro, a Gaiam health and wellness expert facilitates a sequence of meditative, restorative and stress-relieving activities fit to each condition. Finally, each application utilizes an interactive stress management strategy guide.

As many of the conditions which will be targeted through these apps entail pain management, simple sessions of yoga and stress-relieving meditation will be provided as well, led well known yoga instructors, Rodney Yee and Colleen Saidman, who will offer an exercise best fit to the specific condition.

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