HCPLive Network

New Plan Would Permit Doctors to Treat Patients in Other States

MONDAY, June 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A proposal to make it much easier for doctors licensed in one state to treat patients in other states in person, online, or by videoconference has been prepared by the Federation of State Medical Boards, which includes the agencies that license and discipline doctors. 

The draft plan would lead to the biggest change in medical licensing in the United States in decades and could help ease the doctor shortage that's becoming a growing problem as millions of people get health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, The New York Times reported. 

The proposal was created in the form of a legally binding agreement among states. In a recent letter, 10 Republican and six Democrat senators endorsed the plan. 

"The proposed compact would create a new pathway to speed the licensing of doctors seeking to practice medicine in multiple states," Humayun Chaudhry, D.O., president of the Federation of State Medical Boards, told The Times. "It would allow doctors to see more patients than ever before, if they want to."  

Health Highlights: June 30, 2014


Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Study results show that patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia often discontinue treatment. Those that do not frequently augment their initial treatment regimen with one or more additional medications, including some that are not recommended by current guidelines.
The patient-reported painDETECT questionnaire has been shown to accurately and reliably identify neuropathic pain across a range of conditions.
Knowledge of dietary supplement properties, uses, and contraindications is highly relevant to any health care practitioner that treats patients with chronic pain. Data shows that the top four reasons for supplement use are back pain, neck pain, joint pain, and arthritis.
Research indicates that there are probable etiologies of low back pain that can affect treatment outcome and that ignoring pain can possibly cause chronic neurological changes.
Researchers are learning more about the ways in which gut microbiota interact with the central nervous system and the role this can play in pain management.
Although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, opioid-induced hyperalgesia occurs in some patients on higher doses of opioids. Treatment options include reducing, rotating, or completely tapering the opioid regimen.
Magnetic resonance is an effective alternative to biopsy for identifying and quantifying fats in the liver, according to results from a study led by a research team at the University of the Basque Country.
More Reading