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Novel Racial/Ethnic Differences Found in Diabetic Kidney Disease

 
MONDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of proteinuric and nonproteinuric diabetic kidney disease (DKD) vary significantly across racial/ethnic groups, according to a study published online Dec. 13 in Diabetes Care.

To assess racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of DKD, Vivek Bhalla, M.D., from the Stanford University School of Medicine in California, and colleagues reviewed electronic health records (2008 to 2010) for 15,683 persons of non-Hispanic white (NHW), Asian (Asian Indian, Chinese, and Filipino), Hispanic, and non-Hispanic black (NHB) race/ethnicity with type 2 diabetes and without previous history of kidney disease.

The researchers found that, compared with NHWs, racial/ethnic minorities had higher rates of proteinuric DKD (24.8 to 37.9 versus 24.8 percent) and lower rates of nonproteinuric DKD (6.3 to 9.8 versus 11.7 percent). Compared with NHWs, the odds of proteinuric DKD were significantly increased for Chinese (odds ratios [ORs], 1.39 for women and 1.56 for men), Filipinos (ORs, 1.57 for women and 1.85 for men), Hispanics (ORs, 1.46 for women and 1.34 for men), and NHBs (OR, 1.50 for women), after adjustment. In contrast, compared with NHWs, significantly lower odds of nonproteinuric DKD were observed among Chinese, Hispanic, and NHB women and Hispanic men.

"In summary, rates of proteinuric and nonproteinuric DKD vary significantly across racial/ethnic groups," the authors write. "Additional prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations, as such studies could lead to improved public health surveillance of diabetes complications within diverse communities."
 

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