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Obama Signs Bill to Encourage Schools to Stock Epinephrine

THURSDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A new law meant to increase the availability of life-saving epinephrine in US schools was signed Wednesday by President Barack Obama.

Epinephrine can help prevent severe reactions (anaphylaxis) and death in children with severe food allergies. The law provides a financial incentive to states to maintain a supply of epinephrine in their schools and to permit trained school staff to administer it, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Only four states -- Maryland, Nebraska, Nevada, and Virginia -- currently require schools to stock epinephrine, according to the Food Allergy Research & Education organization. Another 20 states permit schools to stock the medication but don't require they do so.

"This is something that will save children's lives," Obama said at a ceremony to sign the bill, WSJ reported.

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