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One 12-Ounce Sweetened Drink a Day Spikes Risk of Diabetes

THURSDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of sweetened soft drinks correlates with the incidence of type 2 diabetes in European adults, with one 12-ounce daily increase in sweetened soft drinks correlating with a 22 percent increase in risk of the disease, according to a study published online April 25 in Diabetologia.

Dora Romaguera, PhD, from Imperial College London, and colleagues from the InterAct Consortium examined the correlation between sweet beverages and type 2 diabetes in a case-control study involving 11,684 incident cases of type 2 diabetes and a sub-cohort of 15,374 participants from eight European cohorts in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

The researchers found that one 12-ounce daily increase in sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drink consumption correlated with hazard ratios of 1.22 and 1.52, respectively, for type 2 diabetes, in adjusted models. The correlation of sugar-sweetened soft drinks with type 2 diabetes persisted after adjustment for energy intake and body mass index (hazard ratio, 1.18), but the correlation of artificially sweetened soft drinks was no longer significant. There was no correlation between juice and nectar consumption with the incidence of type 2 diabetes.

"This study corroborates the association between increased incidence of type 2 diabetes and high consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks in European adults," the authors write.

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