HCPLive Network

Patient Satisfaction Linked to Varied Health Care Utilization

Higher patient satisfaction is associated with less emergency department use, but with greater inpatient admissions, expenditures, and higher mortality, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Joshua J. Fenton, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of California-Davis in Sacramento, and colleagues conducted a prospective analysis of 36,428 participants of a subsample of the 2000 to 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to determine how year-one patient satisfaction scores related to year-two health care utilization and expenditures and to mortality, during a mean follow-up of 3.9 years.

After adjusting for confounding variables, the researchers found that, compared to respondents in the lowest quartile, respondents in the highest quartile for patient satisfaction were less likely to visit an emergency department (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.92). However, they did have higher odds for any inpatient admission (aOR, 1.12), as well as 8.8 percent increased expenditures, 9.1 percent increased prescription drug costs, and increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.26).

"These associations warrant cautious interpretation and further evaluation, but they suggest that we may not fully understand the factors associated with patient satisfaction," the authors write. "Without additional measures to ensure that care is evidence based and patient centered, an overemphasis on patient satisfaction could have unintended adverse effects on health care utilization, expenditures, and outcomes."

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Otezla (apremilast) is an oral, selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate.
New research from Northwestern University has found that schools are woefully unprepared to deal with anaphylaxis and other life-threatening emergencies stemming from student allergies.
New research indicates that doctors who treat anaphylaxis with intravenous epinephrine rather than intramuscular or subcutaneous injections are increasing the risk that patients will suffer overdoses or other adverse reactions.
Anil Asgaonkar, MD, provides a basic overview of the signs, symptoms, and causes frequently associated with hyponatremia, and outlines several standard treatment approaches.
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine have jointly released new recommendations for estimating gestational age and the anticipated due date for pregnant women. The Committee Opinion has been published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.
Researchers in Wisconsin recently announced the discovery of a gene which could help explain certain traits seen in patients diagnosed with diabetes.
Efforts to reduce overuse of non-intensive care unit cardiac telemetry correlate with reductions in telemetry use and considerable cost savings, according to a research letter published online Sept. 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
More Reading