HCPLive Network

Phototherapy Affects Serum 25(OH)D Levels

 
THURSDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with inflammatory skin conditions, phototherapy with ultraviolet (UV) A1 radiation induces a reduction in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25[OH]D) levels, whereas narrowband UVB (UVBnb) and UVA/UVBnb induces significant increases in serum 25(OH)D, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Laurence Feldmeyer, M.D., Ph.D., from University Hospital Zurich, and colleagues examined the influence of UVA1, UVBnb, and UVA/UVBnb phototherapy on serum levels of 25(OH)D and related parameters in 116 patients with atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, morphea, and other inflammatory skin conditions. The participants underwent UVA1 (38 participants), UVA/UVBnb (30 participants), or UVBnb (48 participants) two to three times per week for 53 to 90 days.

The researchers found that, after the therapy, UVBnb phototherapy correlated with a significant increase in serum 25(OH)D, from 22.1 to 39.5 ng/mL. Upon application of UVBnb phototherapy, the increase in 25(OH)D was steeper with a lower baseline 25(OH)D. A significant increase in serum 25(OH)D was also seen with UVA/UVBnb therapy, from 23.9 to 50.3 ng/mL. In contrast, in the UVA1 therapy group there was a significant decrease in 25(OH)D serum levels, from 21.9 to 19.0 ng/mL.

"In conclusion, phototherapy has an impact on 25(OH)D levels in the serum," the authors write. "Our study data [call] for closer examination of a potential confounding effect of various skin diseases and the need for oral vitamin D supplementation in UVA1-treated patients."

The study was funded by Spirig Pharmaceuticals.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) 

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 



Further Reading
A 3-year study of a product meant to help patients dealing with a wide range of conditions including diabetes, hypertension, and weight loss showed positive results according to manufacturer EnteroMedics, Inc.
As national and international health agencies and other groups shift their focus during the current outbreak of the Ebola virus from treatment of those patients with the virus to preventing further large scale events, a team of researchers has reported some success in looking at how Ebola compromises an infected person’s immune system.
Asymptomatic individuals with endomysial antibodies benefit from a gluten-free diet, according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology.
For many patients with chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, medication adherence is often one of the most challenging aspects of the treatment process, especially when the medications prescribed by their health care professional are prohibitively expensive. A study from Manchester University recently showed that many patients with rheumatoid arthritis are not taking some of their most critical medicines due to rising drug costs.
Cleft lip and/or palate does not appear to affect complication rates for ventilation tube placement among pediatric patients, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.
The leading cause of cancer related deaths in both men and women is lung cancer. The 5-year survival rate of lung cancer is only 16%, as 75% of patients with lung cancer are presented with symptoms of advanced disease.
Simulations demonstrate that an excise tax on sugar-sweetened beverages would be the most effective policy for reducing child obesity, according to research published online Aug. 26 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
More Reading