HCPLive Network

Placebo Often Effective for Treating Headache in Children

 
TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Placebo is often effective in treating children with headaches, and innovative strategies are needed to reduce the placebo response rate and prove drug effects in trials, according to two studies published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.

In the first study, Khalil El-Chammas, M.D., from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and colleagues performed a meta-analysis of 21 randomized trials assessing prophylactic headache treatment to reduce the frequency or severity of headaches in children and adolescents. The researchers found that placebos were effective, while drugs, including topiramate and trazodone, showed some efficacy for episodic migraines. Other commonly used drugs were no more effective than placebo.

In the second study, Haihao Sun, M.D., Ph.D., from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in Silver Spring, Md., and colleagues performed a systematic review and analysis of pediatric trial data submitted to the FDA on triptans, already approved for adults but which had failed to show efficacy for treatment of abortive migraines in children. The researchers observed a high placebo response, with pain relief at two hours ranging from 53.0 to 57.5 percent, which could be reduced by non-randomization of patients with an early placebo response.

"Innovative trial designs intended to reduce the placebo response rate may be necessary to demonstrate a drug effect," Sun and colleagues write.
 

Abstract - El-Chammas
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Abstract - Sun
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
 
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 
Further Reading
Physicians and health care providers must be aware of their potential liability when ordering screening tests, according to an article published July 24 in Medical Economics.
For patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, fluid restrictions with 3% hypertonic saline can significantly cut complication rates, according to a study published in the September issue of the Annals of Surgery.
Every year, more and more Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and, according to a recent study, in the near future that number could reach close to 40% of the population.
With so many factors to consider in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, the panelists identify several “unmet needs” of patients with multiple sclerosis and discuss several options for managing them.
Nurses who have high levels of prosocial motivation are more likely to report job burnout, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, held from Aug. 16 to 19 in San Francisco.
A new drug was given tentative approval by the US Food and Drug Administration to help patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
The gender of siblings appears to influence parent caregiving, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, held from Aug. 16 to 19 in San Francisco.
More Reading