HCPLive Network

Pollutant Exposure Tied to Cognitive Decline in Elderly

Long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) (coarse PM: 2.5 to 10 µm in diameter [PM2.5-10] and fine PM: <2.5 µm in diameter [PM2.5]) is associated with faster cognitive decline in older women, according to a study published in the Feb. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Jennifer Weuve, M.P.H., Sc.D., from the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, and colleagues investigated long-term exposure to air pollution with PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 in relation to cognitive decline in a cohort of 19,409 U.S. women aged 70 to 81 years. Exposure to PM was estimated using geographic information system-based spatiotemporal smoothing models, prior to baseline cognitive testing. Cognition was evaluated via validated telephone assessments, administered three times, at approximately two-year intervals.

The investigators found that elevated levels of long-term exposure to PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 correlated with significantly faster cognitive decline. On a global score, two-year decline was 0.020 and 0.018 standard units worse for each 10 µg/m³ increase in exposure to PM2.5-10 and PM2.5, respectively. These differences in the cognitive trajectory were similar to those between women about two years apart in age in the cohort.

"Higher levels of exposure to ambient PM are associated with worse cognitive decline. Importantly, these associations were present at levels of PM exposure typical in many areas of the United States," the authors write. "If our findings are confirmed in other research, air pollution reduction is a potential means for reducing the future population burden of age-related cognitive decline, and eventually, dementia."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Long-term exposure to particulate matter (coarse PM: 2.5 to 10 µm in diameter and fine PM: <2.5 µm in diameter) is associated with faster cognitive decline in older women, according to a study published in the Feb. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Movantik (naloxegol), an oral peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist, has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation in adults with chronic non-cancer pain.
Paul Wicks, PhD, discusses the surge in Internet-savvy patients at the 2014 Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS Meeting in Boston.
Men with male pattern baldness may face a higher risk of developing an aggressive type of prostate cancer than men with no balding, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Adding chest radiation to chemotherapy allows some people with small-cell lung cancer to live longer and cuts recurrence rates by nearly 50%, European researchers report. The research was published online Sept. 14 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, held from Sept. 14 to 18 in San Francisco.
As with many rare diseases, the treatment options for patients with familial hypercholesterolemias are few and far between. In this segment, the panelists discuss several viable options for treating this condition.
Paul Wicks, PhD, discusses the surge in Internet-savvy patients at the 2014 Joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS Meeting in Boston.
The FDA has approved Baxter’s Rixubis [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant)], an intravenous prophylactic treatment intended to control and prevent bleeding episodes and assist with perioperative management for children 12 years and younger with hemophilia B.
More Reading