HCPLive Network

Prenatal Vitamin C Cuts Wheeze in Babies of Smokers

MONDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- For women who smoke, vitamin C supplementation during pregnancy is associated with reduced incidence of wheezing in their offspring through the age of 1 year, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies, held from May 4 to 7 in Washington, DC.

Cindy T. McEvoy, MD, from the Oregon Health & Science University, in Portland, and colleagues examined the impact of supplemental daily vitamin C during pregnancy on the incidence of wheezing within the first year of life. The infants of 76 smokers randomized to vitamin C, the infants of 83 smokers randomized to placebo, and the infants of 76 nonsmokers were assessed at delivery. Ninety-two percent were followed through age 1.

The researchers found that significantly fewer infants of vitamin-C treated versus placebo-treated smokers had at least one episode of wheezing (21 versus 40 percent; adjusted P = 0.019) and fewer infants received medication for wheezing (13 versus 22 percent; adjusted P = 0.14). The incidence of wheezing was significantly lower for those randomized to vitamin C versus placebo for infants of pregnant smokers homozygous or heterozygous for the rs16969968 risk allele (14 versus 48 percent; P = 0.01).

"Vitamin C is a simple, safe, and inexpensive treatment that may decrease the impact of smoking during pregnancy on childhood respiratory health," McEvoy said in a statement. "Though the lung function of all babies born to smokers in our study was improved by supplemental vitamin C, our preliminary data suggest that vitamin C appeared to help those babies at the greatest risk of harm during their development from their mother's smoking in pregnancy."

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
Further Reading
Researchers at ETH Zurich who were studying mice with rheumatoid arthritis found a product that cured the animals of the condition as a precursor to what could be a much larger and beneficial discovery for humans. A statement from the company said the therapy is an “active substance consisting of two fused components.”
For patients who undergo removal of adenomas, colorectal cancer mortality risk is increased for those who had high-risk adenomas removed and reduced for those who had low-risk adenomas removed, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Observational registry-based research can inform patients and physicians about prognosis for subacute or chronic neck or low back pain, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.
The increasing administrative requirements of a medical practice are requiring a team-based approach to care, and physicians must learn to manage the team, according to an article published Aug. 7 in Medical Economics.
As healthcare organizations look to cut costs while increasing patient safety and satisfaction, the focus is all landing on how to make the employee happy.
As the nation tries to cut its health-care costs critics of reform have worried that some patients who need expensive though risky procedures like coronary artery bypass graft surgery might not get them. But a new Harvard School of Public Health study could allay those fears.
With more people than ever using cell phones, tablets, and other personal technological devices, dermatologists have voiced concerns over the increase in cases of nickel allergies. Nickel, one of the most prevalent allergens in the United States, can be found within most handheld electronic devices and jewelry.
More Reading