HCPLive Network

Preventive Measures Not Enough to Combat Clostridium Difficile Infection

THURSDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Although measures have been adopted to combat Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), most facilities have not reported improvement in health care facility-associated CDI rates, according to survey findings published by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

To get an overview of trends at APIC member facilities, 1,087 U.S. APIC members were surveyed from Jan. 14 to 28, 2013, regarding policies and practices put in place to address CDI since March 2010.

The researchers found that only 21 percent of respondents reported having been able to add more infection prevention staff in the previous three years, although CDI rates are at historic highs. Seventy-eight percent of respondents reported using the APIC Implementation Guide on CDI to help identify or lead improvements. Although 70 percent of respondents reported having adopted additional interventions to address CDI since March 2010, less than half (42 percent) reported a decline in the rate of health care facility-associated CDI rates. Of the respondents who had not adopted more aggressive measures to combat CDI, most reported that the best practices were already in place (65 percent) or that CDI was not a high-priority problem for their facility (37 percent). Most respondents (85 percent) had participated in education offerings about CDI, but only 50 percent had initiated patient education programs.

"We are encouraged that many institutions have adopted stronger measures to prevent CDI, but as our survey indicates, more needs to be done to reduce the spread of this infection," Jennie Mayfield, M.P.H., APIC-president elect, said in a statement.

More Information

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
Xi E. Zheng, MD, PhD, shares her views on young-onset colorectal cancer at 2014 ACG Annual Scientific Meeting in Philadelphia, PA.
In what could be New York City’s first case of Ebola, a doctor identified by the NY Post as Craig Spencer, 33, MD an emergency medicine physician at New York Hospital/Columbia-Presbyterian was rushed to a special Ebola unit at city-run Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan. Spencer returned 10 days ago from a stint as a volunteer with Doctors without Borders, caring for Ebola victims in Guinea, one of three West African nations with major outbreaks.
Patients diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy may be able to get a sense of how their condition has progressed without having to leave the comfort of their own home.
Monitoring devices among intensive care patients set off 2.5 million alarms in one month at a U.S. hospital, a new study of "alarm fatigue" reveals. The research was published online Oct. 22 in PLOS ONE.
While in-office visits may still be best, virtual analysis may be a valuable option in atopic dermatitis care, according to a new study published online Oct. 22 in JAMA Dermatology.
After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests. The report was published online Oct. 22 in Neurology.
The US health care system ranks last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
More Reading