HCPLive Network

Reliable Emotion Words Identified to Assess Patient Experience

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A reliable set of emotion words have been identified that can serve as a tool for experience-based design questionnaires in health care, according to a study published in the December issue of Healthcare.

Lauren R. Russ, from the Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, and colleagues surveyed 407 patients, family members, and health care workers in 2011. Participants rated each of 67 potential words as positive, neutral, or negative based on their emotional perception of the word. Words with 80 percent simple agreement in classification were retained in the final emotion word set.

The researchers found that, after adjusting for chance, overall agreement was moderate (κ = 0.55). For positive and negative emotions, the agreement was much higher (κ = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively). Agreement for neutral words was low (κ = 0.11). For the final survey-informed emotion word set there were 20 positive words, one neutral word, and 14 negative words retained.

"We identified a reliable set of emotion words for experience questionnaires to serve as the foundation for patient-centered, experience-based redesign of health care," the authors write.

Full Text


Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.



Further Reading
The rationale behind the decision making processes of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is discussed in three articles published in the Jan. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
The question of whether to stop publishing research funded by the drug industry is addressed in a head-to-head piece published online Jan. 15 in BMJ.
Blogs can be a valuable tool to promote physician practices, according to an article published Dec. 17 in Medical Economics.
Human subjects protections policies do not provide regulatory coverage for all clinical trials, while up to about a quarter of trials are considered overlap trials, according to a research letter published in the March 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Keeping salaries secret hurts worker performance and increases turnover of top talent, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Academy of Management Journal.
Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association's Economic Impact Study.
Changes in medical education and training are suggested to help new physicians address the needs of patients and their families, according to an ideas and opinions piece published in the April 22 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.
More Reading