HCPLive Network

Researchers Say Interstitial Cystitis and Chronic Prostatitis Are Highly Prevalent in the US

 
MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The symptoms of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) are widespread among men in the United States, according to research published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

After developing validated case definitions to identify IC/BPS or CP/CPPS in the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology study, Anne M. Suskind, M.D., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues used population-based methods to screen 6,072 households by telephone for men with symptoms of IC/BPP or CP/CPPS. A total of 149 men met the inclusion criteria and completed the telephone survey.

The researchers found that the weighted prevalence of IC/BPS was estimated at 4.2 percent for a high-sensitivity definition and 1.9 percent for a high-specificity definition. The weighted prevalence of CP/CPPS was estimated at 1.8 percent. These values would equate to 1,986,972 men with CP/CPPS in the United States and 2,107,727 men with the high-specificity definition of IC/BPS. The estimated overlap between high specificity IC/BPS and CP/CPPS was 17 percent.

"The prevalence of and the degree of overlap between IC/BPS and CP/CPPS in U.S. men are higher than previously thought," the authors write. "These estimates suggest that these conditions are widespread and that they might be underdiagnosed by physicians."
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Further Reading
Women aren't treated with dialysis as often as men when they have end-stage renal disease, according to research published Oct. 28 in PLOS Medicine.
From 2000 to 2007, medications to treat nonmalignant chronic pain (NMCP) came with a price tag of $17.8 billion annually in the US, a Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy study found.
Medicare physician quality reporting programs pose significant challenges to medical practices and don’t bring any obvious benefits, so say a majority of medical practice managers in a new survey.
More Reading