HCPLive Network

Role of Omega-3 in Secondary Prevention of CVD Questioned

Thursday, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Sang Mi Kwak, M.D., from the Center for Cancer Prevention and Detection in Ilsan, South Korea, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials to investigate the efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in the secondary prevention of CVD. The final analyses included 14 trials involving 20,485 patients with a history of CVD.

The researchers found that consuming omega-3 fatty acid supplements was not associated with a significantly reduced risk of overall cardiovascular events (relative risk [RR], 0.99), or with all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or transient ischemic attack and stroke. The slight reduction in cardiovascular death (RR, 0.91) did not persist when a methodologically flawed study was excluded from the analyses. No significant preventive effect was seen in any of the subgroups analyzed.

"Our meta-analysis showed insufficient evidence of a secondary preventive effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplements against overall cardiovascular events among patients with a history of cardiovascular disease," the authors write.

The majority of the trials included in the study were funded by pharmaceutical companies.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

For patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, evidence is lacking for a secondary preventive effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplements, according to a meta-analysis published online April 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Progress has been made toward widespread adoption of electronic health records, although there are still barriers to adoption of advanced use of EHRs, according to a report published by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
For patients with hypertension, finding the right course of treatment can be critically important especially when other health factors are taken into consideration.
The risks of marijuana are greatest for teen users, according to an analysis of current data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) published June 5, 2014 in The New England Journal of Medicine.
The International Antiviral Society–USA Panel has released its 2014 report, which provided clinical recommendations to stop HIV transmission.
Even though the active ingredient in marijuana can be associated with memory impairment, it may slow or halt Alzheimer’s disease.
Peripheral neuropathy was found in a third of HIV patients in a recent study of 58 men with a median age of 36 years.
Men who are socially well-integrated show more than a 2-fold reduced risk of suicide, according to a longitudinal study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
More Reading