HCPLive Network

Role of Omega-3 in Secondary Prevention of CVD Questioned

Thursday, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Sang Mi Kwak, M.D., from the Center for Cancer Prevention and Detection in Ilsan, South Korea, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials to investigate the efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in the secondary prevention of CVD. The final analyses included 14 trials involving 20,485 patients with a history of CVD.

The researchers found that consuming omega-3 fatty acid supplements was not associated with a significantly reduced risk of overall cardiovascular events (relative risk [RR], 0.99), or with all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or transient ischemic attack and stroke. The slight reduction in cardiovascular death (RR, 0.91) did not persist when a methodologically flawed study was excluded from the analyses. No significant preventive effect was seen in any of the subgroups analyzed.

"Our meta-analysis showed insufficient evidence of a secondary preventive effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplements against overall cardiovascular events among patients with a history of cardiovascular disease," the authors write.

The majority of the trials included in the study were funded by pharmaceutical companies.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

For patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, evidence is lacking for a secondary preventive effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplements, according to a meta-analysis published online April 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Further Reading
Researchers at Hong Kong University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have identified a link between the influenza A viruses’ genetic diversity and severity of the infection.
The immune system is the new focus of much work on traumatic brain injury (TBI). In a challenge to the paradigm that the blood brain barrier prevents harmful leukocytes from entering the brain, a Texas team tried to neutralize the impact of these cells. Peripheral lymphocytes are activated after TBI. They may then act as potential antigen presenting cells and get into the brain, causing cells there to degenerate.
The CDC announces monitoring for all passengers from 3 Ebola-stricken nations, part of increased surveillance efforts as new Ebola czar Ron Klain starts firs day of work. Meanwhile, Bentley, the dog confined because his owner Dallas nurse Nina Pham has the virus, is cleared to go home. NBC medical editor Nancy Snyderman released from her Princeton, NJ home quarantine, and the NBC cameraman stricken with the disease is now Ebola-free.
Drug coupons could reduce patients' out-of-pocket costs by 60 percent, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.
Depressive symptoms are associated with poorer long-term outcome in patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.
High-risk asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus and normal myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography have a low rate of first manifestations of coronary artery disease; however, patients with DM and abnormal MPS have a seven-fold higher rate of progression to overt or silent CAD despite therapy. These findings were published in the Oct. 1 issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.
Binge drinking among young adult men may lead to hypertension, according to new research scheduled to be presented at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2014, held from Nov. 11 to 16 in Philadelphia.
More Reading