HCPLive Network

Smoking Cessation Cuts Pain in Patients with Spine Disorders

 
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with painful spinal disorders, there is a strong, clinically significant association between smoking cessation and improved patient-reported pain scores, according to a study published in the Dec. 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Using a prospectively maintained database, Caleb Behrend, M.D., from the University of Rochester in New York, and colleagues examined the records for 5,333 patients with axial or radicular pain from a spinal disorder. The authors examined the effect of smoking history on the patient assessment of pain on four visual analog scales during the course of care.

The researchers found that patients who were current smokers reported significantly greater pain in all visual analog scale pain ratings, compared to patients who had never smoked. There were significant differences in the mean improvement in reported pain over the course of care between nonsmokers and current smokers. Those who had quit smoking during the course of care reported significantly greater improvement in pain in visual analog scale pain ratings for worst, current, and average weekly pain, compared to those who continued to smoke. There was clinical importance to the mean improvement in the visual analog scale pain ratings in all three groups of nonsmokers (never smokers, quit prior to study, quit during the course of care), while those who continued smoking during care did not experience a clinically significant improvement in reported pain.

"Given a strong association between improved patient-reported pain and smoking cessation, this study supports the need for smoking cessation programs for patients with a painful spinal disorder," the authors write.

One or more of the authors received payment or services in support of an aspect of this work, and disclosed a financial relationship with an entity in the biomedical arena.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
A new study of Illinois’ Medicaid programs suggests healthcare improvements and cost savings are not incompatible.
Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection is now the leading cause of infectious nosocomial diarrhea in the industrialized world. But by following Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) treatment guidelines, clinicians can significantly reduce recurrence and mortality, a Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy team reports.
A vaccine meant to protect against 9 types of human papillomavirus could prevent 90% of all cervical cancers, according to a study published in the October issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
Nearly 2 million children younger than 5 died worldwide in 2013 of complications from premature birth and pneumonia, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in The Lancet.
For patients in the intensive care unit with septic shock, outcomes are similar for those who receive blood transfusion at a higher or lower hemoglobin threshold, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was published to coincide with the annual meeting of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, held from Sept. 27 to Oct. 1 in Barcelona, Spain.
As people spend more time sitting and working in front of computer screens, studies have shown the risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has grown. A team of researchers recently worked to take a deeper look at specific factors and their roles in the development in the condition.
Because a key antiviral defense mechanism is present in asthmatics, another defect in their immune system must explain their difficulty combating respiratory viruses, according to researchers from Washington University in St. Louis.
More Reading