HCPLive Network

Stopping Aspirin Therapy after Peptic Ulcer Bleeding Increases Risk of Acute Cardiovascular Complications

 
stopping low-dose aspirin after GI bleeding increases cardiovascular riskMONDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cardiovascular disease who discontinue low-dose aspirin therapy after peptic ulcer bleeding have a seven-fold higher risk of death or acute cardiovascular event, according to research published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Maryam Derogar, of the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from 621 patients who had been admitted due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The authors sought to determine how patient mortality and acute cardiovascular events are affected when patients discontinue low-dose aspirin therapy after peptic ulcer bleeding.

The researchers found that, in total, 118 patients among those admitted for upper gastrointestinal bleeding were taking low-dose aspirin therapy. Of these, 40 percent discontinued aspirin therapy after peptic ulcer bleeding. During a median of two years of follow-up, 37 percent of all patients who had been taking low-dose aspirin prior to gastrointestinal bleeding died or experienced an acute cardiovascular event. After adjusting for potential confounders, the risk of death or acute cardiovascular event was 6.9-fold higher for those who discontinued low-dose aspirin therapy, compared with those patients who continued aspirin therapy within the first six months after peptic ulcer bleeding.

"In conclusion, in patients with cardiovascular comorbidities who are treated for peptic ulcer bleeding, aspirin therapy should not be discontinued at the time of discharge from hospital," the authors write.
 

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Further Reading
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved today Xtoro (finafloxacinotic suspension), a novel drug treatment for acute otitis externa, otherwise known as swimmer’s ear, an infection within the outer ear and ear canal, typically caused by bacteria festered in the ear canal.
A support group developed by a hospital in New York has shown that patients with rheumatoid arthritis can see their condition improve by not only addressing the physical symptoms but the psychological issues as well.
Capitalizing on the infatuation many parents-to-be have with their babies-to-be, commercial enterprises are making and selling “keepsake “ ultrasound images. In a related trend, some consumers are purchasing Doppler ultrasound heartbeat monitors over the counter and without the required prescription for their use.
More Reading