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Study Identifies Photoprotection-Deficient Patients with Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

THURSDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Several subgroups of patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) are deficient in their use of photoprotection, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Shirley Y. Yang, from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues examined photoprotective practices of 105 patients with CLE. Demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from patients to identify those with the lowest overall sun-protection habit scores.

The researchers found that CLE patients with medium and dark skin (Fitzpatrick skin types III to VI) and those aged 31 to 50 years had significantly lower sun-protection habit scores, indicating that they were the least likely to practice overall photoprotection. Compared with females, male patients with CLE were deficient in sunscreen use, but were more likely to wear hats. Dark-skinned patients were significantly less likely to use sunscreen and sunglasses than those with Fitzpatrick skin types I to IV. Hat wearing was least likely among patients aged 41 to 50 years.

"Cultural customs and misconceptions shared by those from the general population have a significant influence on the photoprotective habits of this CLE population," the authors write. "These need to be addressed to improve photoprotection rates in these at-risk individuals."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
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