HCPLive Network

Study Recommends Funding for Primary Care Extension Program

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- The Primary Care Extension Program (PCEP) has the potential to transform primary care and needs to be funded, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Robert L. Phillips Jr., MD, from the American Board of Family Medicine, in Washington, D.C., and colleagues explain how the PCEP, which was authorized but not funded by the 2010 Affordable Care Act, is critical to enhancing primary care effectiveness, integrating primary care and public health, and translating research into practice.

The researchers draw an analogy between how the Cooperative Extension Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture sped the modernization of farming a century ago and how the PCEP could speed the transformation of primary care through local deployment of community-based Health Extension Agents. The authors call for $120 million in annual federal funding for the PCEP, with a target of $500 million for future appropriations, saying the PCEP could speed the transformation of primary care, integrating primary care with public health and translating research into practice. The urgency of these goals requires rapidly building the PCEP, the authors say.

"In conclusion, the rapid pace of change in health care demands that a PCEP be viewed as an essential, and not optional, ingredient for transformation of primary care and improvement of population health," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)



Further Reading
Understanding patients is important for all doctors, including those working with patients with limited English proficiency, according to an article published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.
Although methadone accounts for only 2 percent of opioid prescriptions, it caused nearly one in three prescription opioid overdose deaths in 2012, a six-fold increase from 2009, according to the CDC.
Because there is no objective test for pain, and because each patient’s experience of his or her painful condition is subjective and unique, physicians who treat these patients must process a variety of symptoms, signs, and cues to determine whether they can trust their patient’s narrative.
The challenge to medical practices is clear. Recruiting and retaining physicians during a current and looming shortage of healthcare professionals can be a daunting task.
A 6-year study of people with type 2 diabetes shows that intensively lowering blood pressure has a long-lasting effect in preventing heart attacks, strokes, and deaths, but intensive blood glucose control does not. The findings were published online Sept. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation of the findings at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Vienna.
Women of childbearing age in the United States should be encouraged to maintain better oral care and visit the dentist routinely, according to a study published Sept. 18 in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease. Researchers found young pregnant women, those who are non-Hispanic black or Mexican-American, as well as those with lower income and less education, need to improve their oral care.
Consumers are more likely to buy high-calorie foods (HCF), but not low-calorie foods (LCF) on sale, according to a study published in the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.
More Reading