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Switching to Vegetable Fat May Cut Prostate Cancer Death Risk

TUESDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- For men with non-metastatic prostate cancer, the risks of lethal prostate cancer and all-cause mortality are significantly reduced with replacement of carbohydrates by vegetable fats, according to a study published online June 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Erin L. Richman, ScD, from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues conducted a prospective study involving 4,577 men with non-metastatic prostate cancer to examine the correlation between post-diagnostic fat intake and outcomes (lethal prostate cancer and all-cause mortality).

During a median follow-up of 8.4 years, the researchers identified 315 lethal cancer events (distant metastases or prostate cancer-specific death) and 1,064 deaths. The risks of lethal prostate cancer and all-cause mortality were significantly reduced with replacement of 10 percent of energy intake from carbohydrate with vegetable fat (hazard ratios, 0.71 and 0.74, respectively). No association was seen with other fats and lethal prostate cancer. Higher all-cause mortality was seen with an increase in saturated and trans fats after diagnosis (replacement of 5 and 1 percent of energy from carbohydrates, respectively), with hazard ratios of 1.30 and 1.25, respectively.

"In conclusion, among men with non-metastatic prostate cancer, replacing carbohydrates and animal fat with vegetable fat may reduce the risk of all-cause mortality," the authors write. "The potential benefit of vegetable fat consumption for prostate cancer-specific outcomes merits further research."

Abstract
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