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Tadalafil Improves Ejaculatory, Orgasmic Function

 
tadalafil improves orgasmic, ejaculatory funtion in men with erectile dysfunctionFRIDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- For men presenting with erectile dysfunction (ED), treatment with the phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor tadalafil is associated with improvements in ejaculatory and orgasmic function, according to a study published in the February issue of BJU International.

In an effort to compare the effects of tadalafil on ejaculatory and orgasmic function in patients presenting with ED, Darius A. Paduch, M.D., Ph.D., from the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 17 placebo-controlled trials involving 3,581 individuals. In addition, the effects of post-treatment ejaculatory dysfunction and orgasmic dysfunction on sexual satisfaction were assessed.

The researchers found that, across all baseline ED, ejaculatory dysfunction, and orgasmic dysfunction strata, treatment with 10 or 20 mg tadalafil correlated with significant increases in ejaculatory and orgasmic function, compared to placebo. Significantly more men in the tadalafil group with severe ejaculatory dysfunction reported improved function compared with the placebo group (66 versus 36 percent). Similar results were seen with orgasmic dysfunction (66 versus 35 percent). After treatment, residual severe ejaculatory dysfunction and orgasmic dysfunction negatively affected sexual satisfaction.

"Tadalafil treatment was associated with significant improvements in ejaculatory function, orgasmic function, and sexual satisfaction," the authors write. "These findings warrant corroboration in further prospective, placebo-controlled clinical trials involving patients presenting with ejaculatory or orgasmic dysfunction (with or without ED)."

This study and the studies used in the meta-analysis were supported by Eli Lilly, the manufacturer of tadalafil; several authors disclosed financial ties to Eli Lilly.
 

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